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Mirroga

My Game Concept: Outlive!

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Feel free to comment on my work, explain to me how my game could be improved, and other suggestions towards how the game will work NOTE: I have no computer programming skills, no source of funds, and only my spare time to work on the game. Any payment would come from game sales. The only type of "donation" I require are game developers with some experience who believe in making this game a reality. Let me also add that I can only help in the game's creation only through ideas, processing concepts, and creating concept arts. Warning about this is that creating this game is actually impossible unless a game company can be created. Prospective Game Name: Outlive! Desired Hardware: PS3, or even 360 GAMEPLAY ELEMENTS style of Gameplay The game is a first person stealth survival horror game in which you craft traps, weapons and use the enviroment to your advantage. Combining horror, FPS and some roleplaying elements this game will create a tense type of puzzle action atmosphere where you have to plan the most brutal and/or efficient way to escape, evade and kill your enemies. Storytelling Cutscenes will be kept to minimum so as to have a more immersive factor of gameplay. Lets just say I will use the style Dead Space and Half-Life 2 used in storytelling, in which mimicking Half Life 2 when you still control your character while other survivors, monsters, environment-changes occur while you're still playing. Dead Space will be mimicked when you actually need to see something important by having your character actually be uncontrollable to be forced to see something or view an event. All in all, every cutscene is still done in your point of view (either Third-Person style or FPS). The only cutscene that will be actually "called" as one is when you get to see your character in a Second-Person point of view at the game's ending. Gameplay Settings Since this is a game in which you actually avoid as much danger as possible, its heavy in its stealth-type gameplay while adding a style of clever outlay of traps and weapons made from normal household items. The setting is in a faster version of real time. Day and night changes the settings as well as some weather changes. During the day, you get to see monsters easier but also vise versa. In the night, you are obscurely or hardly seen by monsters but also vise versa. Weather changes are both beneficial and hazardous. Torrential rain obscures vision, but is bad for health, an an example. Disillusions and paranoia hinders in actual vision if fear hits your character. This game will be heavily based on actual weather changes, sounds, and vision to create a massive immersive game. Survival Gameplay Core Let me just say this part in how I depict a mechanical engineer as well as a human will act in a setting like this. Seeing such dangerous monsters tearing from a destroyed city, you will not have actual experience in combat. You evade, hide, and avoid these monsters as much as possible in fear of death. You go through alleyways, detours, sewers, and going from house to house to avoid getting seen, while looking out for lurking monsters indoors. Tired from all the actual running away, you try to recover by sleeping in a temporary safe house, or recovering stamina from a corner. You also seek for nourishment to recover. To protect oneself from being found, as a mechanical engineer, you created schematics to create a working weapon from normal household appliances (best i can come up for now is an ingenious melee made from broken glass, and creating a makeshift gun using a staple gun and actual nails) while laying warning signs and traps inside the house (crossed wires which produce sound, simple door jamming, caged appliances that act as walls, etc.). If seen by monsters, you do your best to outflank then or try to disable them with your mediocre, yet effective weapons, enough to escape from it. You are heavily dependent on environmental advantages and also hazard. You spot survivors who are also clinging to life. You decide if you just want to leave them alone, team up to cover each other's heads, or kill them to get their supplies. This is where the karma system kicks in and will likely affect your ending. You'll go from place to place avoiding contact while looking for stocks of food and materials, and also looking for some information of what happened to the city, WHILE TRYING TO ESCAPE. Multi-Story / Exploration Experience This game won't have a linear style of story-mode game. You can go to anyplace you want, get or do anything you want. The main goal is to escape the city, and there are various pathways, styles, and ways to do so. All of your actions will affect your ending. Let me post an example. This is a city crawling with monsters. Sometimes sticking to residential houses won't be enough to survive. Sometimes you got to go to actual supermarkets to get supplies and food, to actual hospitals to get first aid kits, to police headquarters to get actual ammunition, or a news station to get actual information. Each place will have different monsters, survivors, supporting characters, and boss moments. Whatever you do, either doing them all or skipping ahead will affect your ending and thus increase story-mode replayability. Superior Graphics This type of game must have superior, if not top-of-the-line, graphics since its necessary. You need to see clearly what you're doing, the environment, the sounds, and different vision experience to actually survive. It also helps in immersing the character to the setting. Inventory / Weapon Configuration Weapons / Items required in your success is either simply acquired from actual places or created through different combination of household / mechanical items. These custom weapons / items require the raw materials needed. These materials / necessary items can only be obtained in actual places people will find them, or be found in actual survivors. To also avoid abuse of these weapons / items, you have a fair inventory size as well as having a fair weapon degradation system. A good example of finding such materials are shown below: - Food in residential house cupboards or supermarkets - Medical kits found in residential medical supplies or a hospital - Mechanical / Household ware from residential houses or hardware stores, broken or not - Information can be found in the news station, or any form of working media-related appliance - Actual weapon and ammunition can be found in some residential areas, police stations, or an armory - Some of the items above can be traded or stolen from other survivors Character / Inventory Interface The only thing I'd given example of a great inventory / character interface for this game is having no actual interface. Dead Space is a great example of a great interface in which everything you need to know, life meter, ammo capacity is shown in his body and not an actual game interface. So the best example I can say is the Third-Person point of view will be the actual Inventory and Gameplay interface. This is an example of how it'll work: - Health is shown on how well the actual character is moving. If you see him limping, hugging an arm due to pain, or putting a hand to his head, that symbolizes his unhealthiness. - Present weapons and items are shown easily attached to his bodies. His customary weapons will be at his back, med kits at his belt, etc. There's an actual separate interface just to show the items in a named list, which body part it is located at, as well as how heavy those things are. Any item or weapon takes up space either to your body or to a bag. It also takes up weight to give key decisions of which items to carry load. You can also pick different types of bag throughout the game, but you can choose only one. You can either choose a very compact, small backpack which can carry lesser load but will not impede much on your character's speed; or choose to a large, duffel bag if you're the type to carry vast amounts of materials and would rather use more traps and distractions than dash away. Survival Horror's Perfect Element The actual weaknesses of today or even old survival horror game is giving the scare in the game's actual format. Psychological fear can never be experienced by all and startling is not scaring. So I made this game assuming that a helpless man surviving in an apocalyptic city full of unknown monsters would give a little edge in the actual genre called SURVIVAL horror. Third person shooters are a great success in survival horror BUT it degrades later in the game, which I would likely call "Upgrading / Merchant Syndrome." Upgrading and Stores should never exist in a SURVIVAL HORROR game. Whenever stores and upgrades exist, the game tries to balance it with more opponents in the end, which is not scary, but instead, is annoying. My game idea doesn't have upgrade system but still accommodates with different combination and variations of custom-created weapons, items and traps to get by the day. Doing this, I don't need to increase monsters to balance a broken artillery of weapons. Also these weapons actually rarely kill these monsters. These are abominations mutated from a biological weapon. Surely bullets affect them somehow, but everything is just used to buy ample time to avoid anymore conflict as well as avoid more attention. There will be some tougher and different monsters that have different methods to disable, different tracking systems as well as different attacks to add variety while maintaining the scare of still being somehow "helpless." Special Moments Every great game needs these moments, and these special moments can be missed or be all attained depending on your pathways and actions. The best "boss" moments I can come up with are below: - Stealthily walking through the alleyways of a wide road then suddenly, an earth-shaking tremor blocks off all narrow alley pathways. You're forced to move on to the wide road when you suddenly see what caused the tremors. A hulking, tall abomination is stalking the streets for food, shattering the earth every step he makes. A large number of survivors suddenly tried to sprint past the monster trying to avoid getting cornered by it. This is the time you use them as a distraction for your escape. - You went inside the city hospital when suddenly dementia and paranoia kicks in that it poses an actual disillusion, which makes actual reality harder to depict. The whole time you're exploring the hospital, hoping to get some first aids, you are disillusioned by a hospital flourishing with life, then suddenly seeing brutal massacres, bloody hallways, and eerie voices. After exploring, you discover a special abomination clinging to the ceiling are perceiving these illusions as its only way of defending itself. You now try to kill it while it shows illusions of you being stopped by bloody and battered patients or simply creating disillusions of the room changing or the monster dissapearing. - You were able to discover a large safe haven where lots of survivors are living in. You are having a nice, relaxing rest from all the trouble that happened before, mindlessly interacting with different survivor NPCs. All is well until a boss abomination which has insane regeneration kills and consumes survivors. You then either decide to prolong your stay in this haven of death by stocking up on supplies which was owned by dead survivors or simply get the hell away from that monster. REASONS / DISADVANTAGES Stealth-style game is the best style of gameplay in ANY survival horror genre. I believe this idea of a game is not what I would call a "pet" game (meaning, a game which was exclusively created to please ONLY the creator) and would be recognized as a nice game, or even revolutionary. The only problem though is that game producers wouldn't even bother lending their ears to such wonderful game ideas from the masses. Even if this idea was recognized, creating such a game with such an engine, including all non-linear gameplay, different endings, and topping it off with over-the-edge graphics will probably cost A LOT or even be created for at 6-10 years at most. Story: You, an engineer wearing a hooded jacket and jeans, witnessed an explosion happening outside your window. After waking up from being unconcious, you now see the effects of the blast. It damaged the whole city leaving a ruined urban nightmare. But that didn't stop this present nightmare. Now unknown mutations and creatures have been created. You assume it was a failed biological experiment and now a biohazard has occured. You, being one of the survivors who has survived the blast and have not yet been killed by these monstrosities, plan on escaping this city of death. From this time on, YOU survive the game by your own, using your intuitive engineering abilities and proceeding on your own pace and style. You play as a nameless, faceless, (due to the hood covering most of your head, and sometimes showing the fearing and traumatized eyes of your character) mute, (grunts and panting, and other non-word sounds will be the only one heard) normal mechanical engineer. Setting: The setting is a heavy-urban city ruined (presumably an urban city who is inside a country who actually creates biological stuff, so lets go for somewhere in America), burning in flames, or lets just say, the epitomy of destruction, but still having some upright structures and survivors. The city has also been invaded by unknown biological abominations who you, the main character, presumes as mutation created by the blast. Survivors, like you, are now stranded or cornered in your very own temporary safe houses and some team up to fight back against some monstrosities. In layman's term, my setting is the epitomy of survival. What else could top off a broken urban city infested by unknown beasts, while trying to escape, hunting for food, and just simply avoiding every single danger possible?

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