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StoryWriter

Question, relating to game design.

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Well, I have a question about creating a game. I have many ideas for a game to create. The thing is, I do not know programming, but I am an extremely good Organizer, and have some knowledge of programming. I am also a good story writer, hence my name. I am wondering, if it would be a bad idea to create a game, or a good idea. Just cause, if I don't know programming, I am debating if it would be a good idea. Thanks, Story Writer.

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Your question is unclear, Story Writer.
You have ideas. Have you written them all down? In detail? (Because that's what "game design" means.)
You say you're not a programmer, which is not uncommon. BTW, game design and programming are not the same thing (not sure that you knew the diff).
You ask if it would be a bad idea to "create a game." Since you're not a programmer, how would you "create a game"? How would you go about it?
And why do you ask this question? If the consensus was "yes, that would be a bad idea," what would you do differently than if the consensus was no? Essentially, your question "would it be a bad idea" is equivalent to an "is it worth it" question or a "waste of time" question.

The ideas FAQ: http://www.sloperama.com/advice/idea.htm
My "create" FAQ: http://www.sloperama.com/advice/lesson56.htm (this website also has FAQs - have you read any of them yet?)
The "is it worth it" FAQ: http://www.sloperama.com/advice/route66.htm
The "waste of time" FAQ: http://www.sloperama.com/advice/lesson51.htm

Standing by to give better answers, if you care to refine the question...

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I concur with the previous post, but there is also another question I would like to pose. If you ended up creating a game (which I presume is a computer game, since it could be a board or card, requiring no coding knowledge) would you actually be willing to learn a language and put in the time? With enough time, almost any good idea can work well. However, with not enough time, even excellent ideas can flop.

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I concur with the previous post, but there is also another question I would like to pose. If you ended up creating a game (which I presume is a computer game, since it could be a board or card, requiring no coding knowledge) would you actually be willing to learn a language and put in the time? With enough time, almost any good idea can work well. However, with not enough time, even excellent ideas can flop.

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I disagree that if you can't program you can't make a game. There are hundreds of Mods which can be used with little programming experience, like Forge in Halo 3. Or try making a card game or a board game. While it may seem different, the same basic principles still stand.

However, I do agree about writing down your ideas. If you have loads of ideas, write them down, if they are really good, then you might even be able to form a team or even get a job. Focus on explaining everything really clearly and thinking through everything.

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If you are a good organizer, rather than programmers or artists,
You can try to organize your friends together to complete a game, it will play you a good idea.

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Being a good organizer may help in a professional career or some advanced stages of project development... if you manage to get started in the first place.

When starting an indie project yourself, your chances of bringing a team together (and thus getting the chance to "organize" them) are proportional to the skills and work you bring to the table yourself. The more you are ready and capable to do, the better.

It doesn't necessarily have to be programming. Modelers and 2D artists are in demand as well. But approaching people with a game idea (be it a few catchphrases or a complete GDD) isn't going to convince many. It goes without saying that the project starter has the idea refined and worked out - so the question is, what ELSE do you have?

On the other hand, you can also pay people with necessary skills to do their work professionally.

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I've found myself in the same boat, sort of. I have some programming knowledge (mostly Ruby, due to RPG Maker XP) and have co-written some programs having to do with text manipulation for my business, but as far as being able to develop anything resembling a game, I have not been able to find the time to start any real development.

I have many ideas myself and have started putting them together in a video game design program that I found (abandonware, as far as I know, since the company no longer exists).

The following is a series of opinions... they are not speaking from experience, so take them as you will.

If you're serious about developing games, I think the best place to start is developing a drive to work on your project every day. Get a good idea of what type of game you want to develop and for a beginner game, start with something simple. Don't go and create some grand project and dump a bunch of money into it unless you're prepared to lose it.

If you want to create a game mostly by yourself, then learning how to program is a must. Whether you use an RPG Maker program to try your hand at map organization and/or storytelling is up to you, but I think practicing is important. You could just create a town to walk around and talk to people in and let friends play it and give you feedback. It just depends on what kind of game you're interested in making... obviously RPG Maker wouldn't apply to puzzle games a la Tetris and the like, but I believe for storytelling, dialogue, and just general practice, it's a cheap, decent option for someone who's at the very beginning of game development.

Actually playing a lot of games in the genre you want to work in is a good idea, too. Figure out what you like and what you don't like about a game, but don't make the mistake of believing that everyone agrees with you. What you find enjoyable about a game may be what everyone else finds annoying. Not only that, but one thing a lot of writers use to get out of writing anything is claim that they're "doing research".. don't make that mistake, either, or you'll never get anything done.

Building a foundation in programming is important if you're planning on developing alone for a while, unless you have the money to hire someone to create your vision for you. I'm not suggesting that you start with Ruby, although the reason I started with it is because it was simpler for me to understand than C++ at the time. Now that I have a very basic understanding of programming itself, I'm considering switching to C++, simply because it's object-oriented like Ruby and it's a lot more mainstream of a language, especially in the gaming community.

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