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Info about XNA - Under the hood

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Does anyone know any resources on how XNA actually works under the hood? A high level description is good enough. I'm more interested in how its various pieces work together and how it is designed. Thanks!

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Which part of XNA do you referee, too? I am asking because XNA is an umbrella for nearly everything that is game related. I assume you talk about the managed code site. XBox or PC?

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Well, i never used XNA nor have I looked into it in depth. I was referring to the rendering portion of XNA. If it differs on what platform it runs, then Lets stick with PC.

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XNA is a thin managed wrapper over Direct3D9 with helper classes, and a game framework added in.

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I'm going to assume you mean XNA Game Studio/XNA Framework. For reference, XNA technically refers to all of Microsoft's gaming technologies including XNA Game Studio, native DirectX, and the native Xbox XDK.

The XNA framework, rendering wise, is not much more than a wrapper on top of Direct3D 9. There's some special stuff in there to virtualize the graphics device such that you rarely have to recreate or reload GPU assets when a device resets, but otherwise it's fairly simple.

The XNA framework isn't a game engine or anything, so there aren't really any high level things like built in scene graphs or things of that nature. Just a lot of the same operations and objects like vertex buffers and index buffers like Direct3D 9.

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If you're not already familiar with how Direct3D works, you could probably start here for some high-level overview. If you are familiar with D3D, then you'll probably find that things mostly work the same way you're used to.

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