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Dumuzi

Need C++ book recommendation for experienced programmer

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I'm looking for suggestions on a book that will help me bring my C++ skills up a few levels. I've been a C programmer for about 15 years. I've done a fair amount of work in C++ (and most recently in C#). I understand and use OO concepts but I'm far from being an expert. What I'm looking for is a book that will cover the more advanced aspects of C++ without glossing over the foundation too much. I don't want a recipe book or a 100 tips type of book. I also don't want a book then spends 300 pages teaching me how to write loops, use pointers, or create classes. Any suggestions? Thanks, Dumuzi

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Quote:
Original post by Dumuzi
I don't want a recipe book or a 100 tips type of book.

I'm still recommending Effective C++ by Scott Meyers.

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I recommend The C++ Primer. Beware that there's another book by a similar title. I haven't read that one, though. I've only read the one by Stanley B. Lippman et al. It's a great reference. Despite the 'Primer' in the title, I would not recommend it for beginners to programming.

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You don't want tip books, but I recommend the Exceptional C++ series by Herb Sutter. It's written in a tip fashion, but many articles on a single section tend to blend together. It will go into many of the C++ pitfalls and what to do about them, which may be new to you coming from C (exception safety, multiple inheritance pitfalls, object lifetimes, etc.). As the former chair of the ISO committee, he also goes into many of the reasons why they choose to do things a certain way, which is always an interesting perspective to hear.

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There's:

Some of my favorites:

Design Patterns by Erich Gamma, Richard Helm, Ralph Johnson, John, Vlissides
Large Scale C++ Software Design by John Lakos
C++ FAQ by Marshall Cline
Effective C++ by Scott Meyers
More Effective C++ by Scott Meyers
Effective STL by Scott Meyers

Cheers,

Bob

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I've ready some of the above, and they were all great. My favorite C++ book which hasn't been mentioned is:

The C++ Programming Language - Special Edition
by Bjarne Stroustrup

The definitive C++ reference, written by C++'s creator. It's not generally recommended to C++ beginners, but being an experienced programmer you might follow it better. When I finally read it, I wished I had done so earlier. Good for knowing all the tiny details of the language (while the books mentioned above are probably better for tips on practical use). I guess it depends what type of person you are (I like to know all the details, then get practical tips).

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Quote:
Original post by DevFred
Quote:
Original post by Dumuzi
I don't want a recipe book or a 100 tips type of book.

I'm still recommending Effective C++ by Scott Meyers.


A very good book for someone with a good C background.

Josuttis' C++ Standard Library will also be a good intro to the standard library, and is an adequate reference.

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Quote:
Original post by BeauMN
I've ready some of the above, and they were all great. My favorite C++ book which hasn't been mentioned is:

The C++ Programming Language - Special Edition
by Bjarne Stroustrup

The definitive C++ reference, written by C++'s creator. It's not generally recommended to C++ beginners, but being an experienced programmer you might follow it better. When I finally read it, I wished I had done so earlier. Good for knowing all the tiny details of the language (while the books mentioned above are probably better for tips on practical use). I guess it depends what type of person you are (I like to know all the details, then get practical tips).

Yes if you are an experienced C programmer this would be the book for you since it's actually aimed at C programmers converting to C++. I tried to read it before I knew C and it annoyed me because the author would keep bringing up all the differences from C and how stuff is done in C++ vs C. After learning C it was alot easier to read and made alot more sense. Definitely the authorative source and every C++ programmer needs to own a copy sooner or later.
Only downside is that the book is information dense kinda like the original K&R C book in that you have to read it slowly and carefully to make sure you got everything that was being said.

[Edited by - daviangel on September 9, 2009 2:21:41 PM]

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