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bombasticals

SUPREME HACKING

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How can you look at the source code for an xbox 360 game. You know, the kind you buy at gamespot. Modify it so you can improve it is what I need to know. And also for the puspose of comparing you're own code to that of a professional.

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You cant. Not unless you work for the game company that made the game you're interested in. You can wait about 10 years though and wait untill they release the source, like iD software does.

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And unfortunately not all companies do that. There's a reason Epic can still charge a couple million for a license to use their engine commercially.

Chances of you getting the source code to a commercial game are pretty slim. And I don't mean that as a personal attack, just as a broad "if you don't plan to throw a couple million into a commercial game's development using the xbox game's source code as a base, you won't get the code."

Sorry.

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Assuming you find a disassembler, you could get it back to platform assembly. And there may be a decompiler for that assembly. But you will almost never be able to restore that type of code back to something readable. And it will never get back to looking like the code the programmers wrote originally. At least that is how it is for the C++ part of the game.
Archives can be unpacked to source files.
Compiled shaders can be converted to assembly.
Compiled lua can be converted back to text.
I've heard that compiled .NET assemblies can be converted back to reasonable source.
etc.

As mentioned above though, you CAN get source for some commercial games.
iD released several sources like Quake.
Homeworld 1 is open sourced.
Decent Freespace is open sourced.
There are many open-sourced ports/remakes of games that are binary compatable with the source data files for the original game (syndicate, FreeCraft, ...)

Also note, Don't Read Source Code.

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Quote:
Original post by bzroom
You can wait about 10 years though and wait untill they release the source, like iD software does.


Even then, parts of the code will still be commercially confidential, and would have to be removed, e.g. hooks into the XDK APIs.

Even if you gained access to the source code for a console title, you'd need a development kit to test and run your changes on, which requires you to be a licensed developer with MS/Sony/Nintendo, and having thousands of dollars on hand for a single devkit that can run the unsigned executables that you compile.

There is one sure-fire way to look at the source code, though: Get a job at the development studio that made the game.

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Quote:
Original post by KulSeran
Also note, Don't Read Source Code.


That is one of the best blogs I've read in a long time! I 100% agree, especially about the NeHe tutorials. I've slowly come to the realization that they are largely worthless. I wish I could have read that years ago. Thank you for posting that.

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Quote:
Original post by maspeir

That is one of the best blogs I've read in a long time! I 100% agree, especially about the NeHe tutorials. I've slowly come to the realization that they are largely worthless. I wish I could have read that years ago. Thank you for posting that.


I personally disagree, at least to an extent.

Whenever I needed to do something quickly in OGL, I looked there. Not as line-by-line learning tutorial. Just to get the basic idea.

Tutorials are too often abused as primary or definitive learning material, or copy-paste repository.

Tutorials are ABCs. They give a quick glance into rough solution, or more commonly, API. But to properly understand and apply the contents of tutorial, one must start at the beginning, and know what was omitted.

OGL (or any API) tutorial is just that - the shortest, simplest possible example of which API functions to call and in what order. Everything else should be completely omitted for sake of clarity (error handling, best practices, structure, performance, ....).

It's not tutorials per se that are the problem (see MSDN, where each and every function comes with API tutorial in 3-5 languages). It's how they are (ab)used or misunderstood.

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Quote:
Original post by Antheus
Quote:
Original post by maspeir
That is one of the best blogs I've read in a long time! I 100% agree, especially about the NeHe tutorials. I've slowly come to the realization that they are largely worthless. I wish I could have read that years ago. Thank you for posting that.
I personally disagree, at least to an extent.

Whenever I needed to do something quickly in OGL, I looked there. Not as line-by-line learning tutorial. Just to get the basic idea....

It's not tutorials per se that are the problem (see MSDN, where each and every function comes with API tutorial in 3-5 languages). It's how they are (ab)used or misunderstood.
I can see that for other tutorials, but NeHe seems a poor example. You have seen the number of people who set out to write the next Crysis in immediate mode, having just found NeHe...

I know there are sporadic efforts to update those tutorials, but I still feel it would be a positive step forward to delete the whole mess of old tutorials - at least that would create a vacuum to foster newer tutorials.

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