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conejo5991

C++ OOP purely online courses?

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I just posted this question on one of my last responses. But I think it would be a good idea to ask it formally in a new thread. Is there such a thing, where for not too much money, that a person could signh up to take a C++ online only Object Oriented Programming course? So that way, I would not have to ask questions all the time, but could have one instructor or online T.A. resolve most of my issues? I would also like to get more into Python, and even eventually move up to scripting and web design. Are there similar, single target course for these things too? I've already had all my lower division in other areas. So I try to take certain target things, like this OOP knowledge, which I need, as I go along. Thank you.

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Have you looked into GameInstitute.com? They are relatively cheap and their classes are pretty well made. I've done the C++ modules before.

If not that, then why not pick up a book and try going through it and if you get stuck ask on here. We don't bite, much. :)

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Thanks. I'll put on my styrofoam padding then and ask you a question if you will.

When they say that a member function is "associated with"

an object in OOP, how is it associated with it?

What does the member function do to the object

that changes the object?

I imagine it could do a variety of things of course,

but essentially, why is it necessary to even have a member function

"associated with" an object? Why can't they just have objects?

Or is it that the object is just lonely and had to go

to a member function dating website or something?

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Quote:
Original post by conejo5991
Thanks. I'll put on my styrofoam padding then and ask you a question if you will.

When they say that a member function is "associated with"

an object in OOP, how is it associated with it?
In OOP in general the answer is in some way(I know of at least a half dozen different ways.) Since you mention C++ there are two ways in which a function can be associated with a class. The first is to be a member function. An example of this is the std::string class which has a function called length. The second way is for the function to be declared in the header with the class. An example of this with the std::string class is the getline method. It takes a istream as the first parameter and a string as the second. ie:

std::string astr;
getline(cin, a); //associated but not a member function
a.length(); // a member function
Quote:


What does the member function do to the object

that changes the object?
It gets special access to the classes internal state outside of that it does what you code it to do. Also it allows polymorphism.
Quote:


I imagine it could do a variety of things of course,

but essentially, why is it necessary to even have a member function

"associated with" an object? Why can't they just have objects?

Or is it that the object is just lonely and had to go

to a member function dating website or something?


class foo{
public:
int bar;
int baz();
private:
int quux;
}
Anyone and their brother can access bar it is public. Only member functions such as baz can access quux. Now you might say if I am writing all the code what sense does it make to have a variable that I can't access I know what it does so I should be able to use it. Well the idea is that it helps you think about the class as a complete object with both properties and behaviors. If you need to change how baz operates and quux is no longer necessary then you can remove it because outside code doesn't depend on it and you know this to be true because the compiler enforces it instead of counting on yourself to memorize it.

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