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GDNB

2D vs. 3D

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sup, I figure this is the right forum to post this message..Basiclly I want your input on 2D vs. 3D..do you think based on your experience, that a person has to learn 2D before he learns how to do 3D..I known that the math for 3D is much harder then 2D,and the engine is much more complex..but that is what they said about Windows and why people feared coming from DOS to Windows..Windows is not hard to me and I know other people agree with me..Alright..PEACE!

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Well why don''t you try the 3D math out for yourself and see what you think.

I''m writing a series of articles called "The World of 3D Graphics".

You can get the first one here

And the second article should be published shortly.

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sup, I might try the math but if it is to hard I will just wait till I get it in school,,I am only in the 11th grade..and the skipped geometry and gave us Algebra II is was an experiment that went terribly wrong LOL..PEACE!

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Or as a crash corse in both...

You could try 3d with an orthagonal view to do isomorphic or 2d. The nice thing about using the 3d hardware is all of the effects you can get for free because of the advanced nature of the hardware. You also learn things like texture managment, and simple matrix manipulations ( scaling, shearing, ratation ).

It''s not that much harder than straight 2d, and you have a leg up twards learning 3d stuff too.

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quote:
Original post by GDNB
sup, I might try the math but if it is to hard I will just wait till I get it in school,,I am only in the 11th grade..and the skipped geometry and gave us Algebra II is was an experiment that went terribly wrong LOL..PEACE!


Well, if you''re fairly good with math in general then you might be able to figure it out. Graphing and plane geometry is important-you''ve probably done graphing in Algebra I+II. If I remember correctly, you''ll be taking trig soon, that''ll be a big help. If you feel you need it pick up a geometry book from the library, maybe get cliff''s notes, whatever you think is best. Just work through the problems, you can always ask your math teacher for help. If you go to Sylvan(Did I spell it right?) or one of those tutor-homework-help places like some people do they can help you. One thing you might want to do if you know computer programming is learn opengl, so you get a really firm understanding of how 3d works.

As for 2d, there''s actually not much geometry in it, it''s mostly stuff you''ve probably covered in algebra.

It wouldn''t hurt if you''ve got an older brother or sister who took geometry who can help you (or an older sibling of a friend.)

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In maths and physics 2D is a subset of 3D, and so it''s easy to learn 2D first before moving on to 3D. There are a few things in 3D which don''t exist in 2D, but most things, and all the most fundamental things, like position and velocity vectors, work the same in 2D and 3D.

Graphics is different: working with 2D and 3D graphics are totally different. In 2D the screen is an exact representation of a 2D world, so generally you just design your world to fit the screen. In 3D the screen in a view onto a world, and the techniques in creating that world and view are far more complex. In most cases you use and API like DirectX to simplify getting things working, but that means there''s still a lot extra to learn.

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