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EvilCrap

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hi. game programming, do unitversites or tech schools teach it? i havent been able to find any in curriculum as far as graphics (DXx,OPENGL..), THeory, etc... also, i havent been ablr to find MFC, and such, stated in a curriculum are these general parts of, say, a programming c++ ix course? or is all this stuff learned online, and from books?! so far ive looked into itt, and westwood, and am unsure. where else should i look? if this is this the incorrect forum, which is more suitable?

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Guest Anonymous Poster
*cough* Digipen.
http://www.digipen.edu/

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I'm not sure where this belongs either, maybe under general but it's mildly germane to software engineering.

It would be highly unlikely (watch out for meteorites) for a C++ class to teach anything about MFC unless it's a training class dedicated to teaching it.

I had a 'master's level' computer graphics course that covered the basics of the rendering pipeline and we used OpenGL after we made our own polygon filler.

I learned what I know about MFC from a 21days book and the online docs. I think there's a MSCD (M$ Certified Developer) track that coveres all the latest M$ technologies MFC may still be in it (p.s. it's expensive and doesn't count towards any degree).

There's a couple of facilitates that specialize in game programing, I unfortunetly can't recall there names.

There's Games Instritute which is geared towards the hobby developer. Cost about $50 a class; a little more for more specialized classes (like the one on BSP trees).

But generally, universities do not teach much game programming - which I don't understand; Mechanical Engineers get to work on race cars for their senior projects, Software Engineers should get to work on video games :p

...
Remembered that the AI class wrote checkers programs and they played eachother for competive grades

Edited by - Magmai Kai Holmlor on July 18, 2001 12:31:15 AM

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Depending on the type of games you are interested in developing, you might want to take some advanced mathematics courses (especially trig and anything dealing with geometry or algorithm optimizations), physics, and maybe a little fuzzy logic if you''re feeling bold

This won''t give you the general game programming techniques but it will ensure that you can make the most out of them once you get them

Get the names of the professors teaching different computer science courses at your university of choice and talk to them, find out what is on their curriculum. I know my brother is currently working on getting his CS degree, and one of his projects is for a group of students to create a WW3 game using Java. The class material itself may not be real enlightening, but corresponding with your classmates when a project is in the scope of a game will probably be priceless

Seeya
Krippy

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I''ve just started with game programing, so my opinions are probably premature, but I''m finding that most of my academic courses are extremely handy for games programming.

i.e. one course that was basically compiler theory and focused on DFAs, NFAs, etc. Now it looks like I have a nice head start on AI. All that work in multivariable calculus, which is a good chunk of 3D programming (I''ve been told). That hardware-for-cs-majors course that taught assembler, and gave some insights on the nature of hardware growth.

Then there are the obvious ones like data structures, algorithms, network programming. And the not so obvious ones like LISP, operating systems, numerical computing, physics.

On the other hand, I''ve learnt nothing about graphics through my school. But I feel like I have a really good foundation to start on.

-j

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