• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
BearishSun

Any good dead reckoning examples?

4 posts in this topic

Hi, I'm wondering if there are any good dead reckoning(I hope I'm using the term right) examples? I'm currently working on a MMO, and I have no previous experience with this I'm having problems syncing the data properly. Currently I send 5 updates per second(is this too low?). I run movement on both client and server and try to adjust the client data slightly based on the actual data received from the server although I have problems when character suddenly stops. (I can either have him standing at the wrong position client-side, or I can fix his position which causes him to "glide" to the new position). I'd really like that when he stops he stops pretty much near the actual server position, because I don't notice the gliding in other MMOs(unless under heavy lag). I've tried searching though many books and tutorials but I can't find anything useful, and I plan on spending the next month to have this working perfectly in my game, so it would be helpful to have a working and tested example. Or any advice? Thanks!
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you extrapolate, stopping will be a problem no matter what.

An alternative is simply to display every entity based on data that you receive (interpolate between old positions). This will cause some latency in movement to be visible, but that's typically OK when you're doing an RPG.

If you want to do extrapolation, the sample app for the Entity Position Interpolation Code does show what it looks like.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I do interpolation for the other(non-player) entities(250ms in the past) and that works fairly well.

I implemented and tried your algorithm a while ago although extrapolation just doesn't work too well for me, I guess I just haven't given it a proper try yet since the interpolation works pretty well. (I tried interpolating and switching to extrapolation only when I ran out of updates, which didn't work out too well)

But for the player character I use a different approach since I run the simulation both client and server side. Client sends basically WASD key presses to the server and the server sends a position update every 200ms. If the difference between client and server is too high the client tries to slightly adjust the players movement so that it will be closer to the servers position during the next update. However that doesn't work when stopping...

Problem is with the combat system I'm trying to do(I don't wanna do a WoW-style select&use skill system), but I wanna be able to swing the sword and hit anyone in front of the player. The problem is, when the player goes to attack someone, he stops in front of his enemy although those few ms it takes for the server to update on the server he actually ends up just barely behind his enemy. Therefore when he swings, the server checks if there's anyone in front of him and since there's noone no hit occurs. Although the client clearly sees he's standing in front of his enemy.

I don't know what would be the best way to handle that? Should the target selection happen client-side and then just loosely check if the enemy is range on the server? Although I fear that opens up opportunity for cheating.

Or maybe if the server checked the enemies previous position(when the "sword swing" packet was sent)?
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
One way to handle it is to show it "as is" on the client, and then turn the player attacks on the client into commands for the server (and other players) to see.

Another option is to simply delay everything by 250 milliseconds. Then it will all be in sync. The player will learn to compensate, and "brake" 250 milliseconds before he actually wants to stop.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0