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Graiskye

Getting wet feet.....

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Well hello to all the other budding GD's out there, hope you are all having a great day. The question I am asking I am sure has been asked a million times, and I have read a lot of them, Ive researched, read tutorials and papers on the subject, but I come to GDNet to get opinions from other noobs like me. So here it is, I want to get into development of software, games yes of course, but i do not want to be limited by what I learn, so should I just dive into the 'C' family, or is there any benefit to playing around with the 'Game creator Basics' like Blitz, and Darkbasic. A bit of history, I am probably a lot older than most on this board, I grew up with the Apple II, IIe, IIc, etc....in schools, at home I had multiple PC's, COCO's, TI's, Timex Sinclairs etc etc. I have very fond memories of my first personal PC,the MC10, I learned to program basic on it, so I have a rather dusty understanding of Basic. At one time I could code rather well in it, and had started developing games for I and my friends to play. I wonder in anyone else can remember the days of copying(typing) pages and pages of code from the latest Rainbow, then hoping you didn't make any whopper mistakes, entering 'run', then seeing if you actually got a game out of it, Halcyon days to be sure. So twenty some odd years later and I get the yearning to get back into programming and trying to make games to amuse myself. Thus my question, should I just concentrate on the game maker type languages or just dive into C++, or possibly Python ? Thanks for any advice anyone offers, -Grais.

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Holy @#$%^, you must be almost as old as I am. First computer was an F1 I built myself. Then a Coco, modified for 64k (upper 32k shadowed by the Basic ROM). Loved those Motorola chips. And, yes, a subscription to Rainbow! Hated those C64 guys, though.

In any case, I'm an old fart and C++ has never let me down - both in personal use and in a couple of projects I was involved in. If you have a Windows machine, DirectX and OpenGL are easily used. C# may do you well, also, though I've only tried it a couple of times. Here on gamedev, there's lots of support for the C languages, which may be a consideration if you're just getting back into it.

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Thus my question, should I just concentrate on the game maker type languages or just dive into C++, or possibly Python ?

It depends on who you are - a game designer / artist or [ a good programmer / you like math and things like that and you want to learn a programming language ].
If the first one - game maker type languages.
If the second one - C++ :) I know, I know, many people say it's tough (even if it's one of the logically understandable languages not like some other which you have to burn in your brain) but I started with it and you can see where I have gone with it -
:)
So it depends entirely on you - what you will want to be when you finish the first step of learning. :)

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DarkBASIC is a great language, and it is, of course, BASIC. The main benefit of DarkBASIC is quick and good results. It has a good mix of power and the ease of use of BASIC. It's a great language to start off with. C++ is defiinitely the language of choice for most developers, but it isn't that easy for someone to start off with, or get the hang of quickly. Try out there trial version at thegamecreators.com, and see if you like its feel.

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Original post by kryotech
DarkBASIC is a great language, and it is, of course, BASIC.


Not a good choice for those who like logic thinking. Because that language lacks logic.. in the names of functions, in syntax, in the complex types usage concept... I'd recommend to avoid it.

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