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Wibbs

Animation fps for 2d games

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Hi, Sorry if this is a stupid question, but I can't seem to find the answer anywhere. When designing animations for 2d sprites, how many frames of animation per second is it usual for game animations to use? Thanks, Wibbs

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Depends on the amount of RAM you need to squeeze the textures into.
- if a walk animation is 24 FPS and 2 seconds long, each frame is 32x64, 32 bit color..
= 48 frames, 8192 bytes (8 kB) per frame
== 384 kB.
So it looks acceptable now.
However, the memory requirements tend to increase very fast when this kind of animation is used.

P.S. As the games are usually running at 60 fps, you should keep the FPS of your animations to numbers like 10 / 15 / 20 / 30 -- if 60 is divided by any of them, you'll get a whole number and that means your animations won't suffer from artifacts if they're displayed when game has vertical synchronization enabled.

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Quote:
Original post by Wibbs
So a walk cycle at 24 fps for a reasonably detailed natural walk would be acceptable?

That would be more than acceptable, that's almost certainly overkill. For slow actions like walks even Disney films only usually run at 12fps, and for a game where the characters are much smaller on screen you could probably get away with half that again.

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Ah cool, thanks both as that is exactly the kind of information I was after. In retrospect I probably didn't phrase my original question carefully enough! I certainly hadn't fully considered memory implications of animations with large numbers of fps, and I'd forgotten that a lot of slower screen animation was done at 12fps.

Thanks again,

Wibbs

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Animations often look smoother at fewer frames due to the artist's limitations (and in the case of pixel graphics, the resolution). If you're using flash/vector animation the frames are automatically generated anyway, manual framerate is only an issue for non-vector animation. Even then, there isn't really a need to have a standard framerate for the game, it's entirely possible to display each frame for whatever length of time looks best, or display the same frame for different times in different situations (for example a character with a 'haste' buff, you might want them to walk 10% faster, thus you have to speed up the walk animation framerate 10%).

Anyway a reasonably detailed natural walk is standardly animated using 8 or 10 frames for the cycle; I can't imagine a situation where you would want to use more than 16 (unless maybe if the character was going to be walking in super slow motion, but it's unlikely you'd want to do that...)

There are plenty of example walk animations around the internet, the ones that are available as animated gifs are particularly useful because you can see the number of frames in the image properties.

Example - This is a jog cycle I did, so it's a little different (and artistic nudity warning because this is supposed to be an mmo avatar base with clothing added later) but it's 14 frames - I could conceivably have added another pair or frames where the foot kicks forward to get 16. Thin Female Anime Avatar, Jog Cycle If you notice it looks a bit flickery, that's partly because it's not a finished polished animation, but partially because with so many frames it's very difficult to place the lines accurately enough to make the motions look smooth. On the other hand I've got 4-frame animations that look perfectly smooth.

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standard animation info -
normal film framerate - 24 fps
normal animation for characters and objects - 12 fps (in twos)
normal animation for moving camera/background - 24 fps.

this is standard for the animation industry.

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Hi Tremault,

Thanks for the info, but those figures are the ones I did know. The part I was unsure of was how this translated to 2d games where the fps can potentially fluctuate with time, but I think I have got all the information I need now to make a start on some of the ideas I have. Thanks to everyone for the replies to my original question.

Wibbs

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