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Julia_Robert

Salary

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A lot of programmer are telling me that game programming isn''t well paid compared with other kind of programming like: (Web Programming, Windows Programming & Microsoft technology (.Net framework)) etc.. is that true ? I wanted to know your opinion -because it could be a factor for me does the difference of salary is that big ? anyone have a couple of website I can see salary study ? Thanks guys

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The July 2001 issue of Game Developer magazine had an in-depth suvey about this. I''ll try to post some of the relevant information. Since you''re interested in programming, I''ll just post that, but they had everything else like artists, designers, etc.

Ok, a regular game programmer with 1-2 years experience makes on average (all of these figures will be average salaries) $55.478 thousand a year. with 3-5 years experience, $62.394, and with 6+, $69.128. For lead game programmers, 1-2 years, $56.539. For 3-5 years, $61.775. And for 6+, $88.358.

About 54.3% of regular game programmers have 1-2 years of experience. About 31.9% have 3-5 years, and 13.8% have 6+ years. About 36.7% lead programmers have 1-2 years. 47% have 3-5 years. And 16.3% have 6+ years.

Also, for all programmers, 97% were male, 3% female. Average female salary - $70,013. Average male, $62,488. The highest salary they found was $300,000.

Sorry I don''t have any information on regular (application) programmers. But I''m pretty sure they make on average more than game developers. Hope you found some of this useful.



"We are the music makers, and we are the dreamers of the dreams."
- Willy Wonka

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Not sure what you talking about but starting out at nearly 60k/year after just 1-2 years of experiance is REALLY good. I''m actually suprised they are so high, being that everyone talks like regular application programming pays more than game programming. I guess regular application programming pays really really good...

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Don''t forget that a large percentage of those jobs are in Silicon Valley where a 3 bedroom fixer upper can cost you close to a million. Either that or a two hour commute each way so you can get the affordable $300k home.

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LilBudyWizer is right, these statistics don''t cover cost of living. Making 60k in Silicon Valley could possibily be comparable to making something like 30k in an area where cost of living is relatively low.


- Houdini

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For engineering, a San Jose job will get you about +15% salary over the same position elsewhere to account for cost of living. This works even within the same company with offices many places; it''s just understood that the San Jose people must have a higher salary structure in order to make mortgage payments. (Oh, who are we kidding--we all know it''s only possible to rent there).

As far as the original poster''s question about whether game programming nets less than other types of programming, the answer is yes. From what I''ve seen, non-game programmers make about $10k more than BitBlt''s figures. I don''t know if the web stuff is still that competitive, but database management is a very high-paying high-demand position. We''ll see though; the current economy isn''t being very kind to programmers.

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quote:
Original post by Epoch
You''d think with the level of difficulty and competition there is to get into the game industry the salaries provided would be quite good.

It''s the competition that makes the salaries lower! Since there are far more people who want to program games than there are positions to be filled, it means companies can offer lower salaries, knowing they will still get someone for the job.

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