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How to obtain the data in vedio card memory without attaching the program

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hi, When a 3D program is running, how can I obtain the data in the vedio card memory, namely the 3d models, without attaching or hooking the program? It is better if there is some simple samples. Thanks!

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The closest thing I can think of is GLIntercept, which, as the name says, intercepts OpenGL calls and can reconstruct the scene on the card from that. For obvious reasons, this cannot be used with Direct3D programs.

Please don't use GLIntercept to rip 3D models from commercial games. Those guys work really hard on creating their assets, and you're on a forum of game developers.

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Quote:
Original post by all_names_taken
Isn't it allowed so long as you use it non-commerically?

No.

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No is a simple answer.

A longer answer is that it depends on the laws that govern you.

Some things that some software licenses disallow me from doing, are in fact legal where I live. Some smart ones, like Microsoft, make a note about this in their EULA. They know they cannot over-ride any laws that govern me.

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Quote:
Original post by all_names_taken
Isn't it allowed so long as you use it non-commerically?


Short: No.

Long: If it's for something you're doing for your own use (eg. as temporary models in a project you don't intend on releasing at the very moment) then no one will honestly care. But if you were to release anything with those models/textures/whatever, you're stepping into territory you shouldn't.

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Quote:
Original post by reptor
Some things that some software licenses disallow me from doing, are in fact legal where I live.

Yep, if you live in one of the grey countries on this map...

There are some universal aspects of copyright law, that are valid in all signatory countries of the Berne Convention (ie. about 95% of the planet). Distributing copyrighted work is part of these universal aspects (that's the whole point of copyright), apart from some very narrowly defined exceptions (parody, reporting, etc). Whether you distribute the work for money or for free is relevant to the height of monetary damages and compensations (which can indeed vary significantly from country to country). But it does not change the fact that you committed copyright infringement, and you can be brought to court over this.

EULAs are completely different beasts. They regulate much more than just copyright. License usage restrictions, resale and license transfer conditions, reverse engineering, warranties, liability in case of software defects, privacy of personal data - all that is very variable from one jurisdiction to the other. But all this is entirely independent of copyright.

In fact, copyright is one of the very few legal principles that are almost universal over the planet (although not universally enforced, which is a big problem in some countries).

(IANAL, blabla)

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