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Fuji

c++ learning books

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Hello. I am thinking about getting a book to learn c++ more thoroughly. I'm not sure what one to get (my friend suggested one to me but my memory fails me). So, if you have any suggestions, I am entirely open as long as you have actually read them yourself before telling me to go buy them.

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The one my friend mentioned is C++ How to Program 6th Edition by Deital (recognized it by the cover). Anyone have anything to say on that one? The reviews on it seem to be negative but my friend really recommends it.

[Edited by - Fuji on October 30, 2009 7:12:21 PM]

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Quote:
Original post by Fuji
The one my friend mentioned is C++ How to Program 6th Edition by Deital (recognized it by the cover). Anyone have anything to say on that one? The reviews on it seem to be negative but my friend really recommends it.

I've read all the books mentioned here and of all 3 I recommend the Programming -- Principles and Practice Using C++ if you are serious about getting a better grasp of C++ and programming in general. I had to read the Deitel for a C++ course in school and I think the reason it's used in a lot of colleges is that it has alot of practice problems in it. It's a terrible book to read since the authors try to cram like way too much info into the already cramped 1000 pages. It's more of a cookbook type book. I didn't like it at all. Might as well get the Horton book if you like that style since Horton's books are similar teaching C++ in a C like style but also covers how to use Visual Studio in more depth. Accelerated C++ is okay but programs in it are too boring for me. The book basically uses a boring grade program example through most of the book. Now that I think about it Deitel does too LOL. The new Stroustroup book just blows the other 2 books out of the water and the ironic thing is that's not even really a book on C++. That's why it's got Principles and Practice in the title. C++ is only part of the book and he spends alot of time covering stuff that everyone should learn along with C++ like what you should think about before even writing any code, how you should develop your code incrementally, etc. Basically, it's like having an expert give you all the tips and tricks so save you tons of grief later on. It's alot harder book than the other 2 books too because of this though. He covers GUI programming for example that the other book don't. Actually cover how to parse input correctly which the other 2 books don't, etc. I think you get the idea. Anyways, you can get the Table of Contents of all the books mentioned online to see for yourself.

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For learning the language itself there are plenty of Internet tutorials floating around.

If you need a book, pick one that turns you from someone who knows some C++ keywords into someone who can solve problems with C++. Daviangel's advice regarding the books that was mentioned sounds good.

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