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Questions about bright lights

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Hi, I'm doing a particle explosion, like a firework. It's in DirectX, but that doesn't matter :-) I want it to look more real, and I've got several questions about it. The colors are the main problem. When you've got a really bright light in reality, the color changes - it might get washed out towards white. (Plus, there's halo&flares.) But I have no idea how to simulate that. Can that be achieved in a usual RGB pipeline or do you need HDR for a realistic look? Is there a comprehensive book or website that explains these topics in detail? Yours

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First of all, light is addative.

Simple scenario

first light color: << 0.7 Red, 0.0 Green, 0.3 Blue >>
second light color: << 0.4 Red, 0.0 Green, 0.1 Blue >>

result at surface: << 1.1 Red, 0.0 Green, 0.4 Blue >>

Now to make sure that lights turn to white in heavy over lighting,
use only lights that have all RGB components above 0.1.


Second of all, particles can be bigger than one pixel and
particles can overlap.

Put image of halo/flare in to particle, and change blending mode
to addative. (remember light is addative. so should be your light simulation)
Put 5000 overlapping addative particles to screen, and you have explosion
of white blob.

Finally play and tweek with parameters and images about 1x week.

/Tyrian

Ps. Use meny different kinds of particles in one particle simulation.
sparks, dust clouds, lightning, lasers, stars, rubble etc...

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The more realistic way to accomplish this is to switch to HDR rendering. With HDR you render all intermediate stages to a high-precision floating-point buffer (so that you can support colours brighter than 1.0,1.0,1.0), and composite the final result to the screen with an exposure function. The exposure function is then chosen to represent a reasonable range of visible light, and washout anything above that. Bloom can also be applied to intensify the effect.

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Sorry für the late reply. I tried out some of your suggestions before replying.


Quote:
Put image of halo/flare in to particle, and change blending mode
to addative. (remember light is addative. so should be your light simulation)
Quote:
Bloom can also be applied to intensify the effect.
Those two things were key to a great result! And it took very little tweaking to achieve a good look.
I'll try HDR too when I have time.

Thanks!

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