• Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  

How do you deal with harware-specific issues on the game you developed.

This topic is 3033 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

To those people who are almost at the finishing phase or have released a PC game before -- I need your help! What are your thoughts, general tips, and plan of action in dealing with hardware-specific "bugs" that appear during QA? For instance, video card chipsets X, Y, and Z can't run your game (crash) or is too slow as compared o chipset W, which is way inferior to X, Y, Z but is doing fine. Normally, how do you deal with these kind of things? Also, we have a minimum spec that we follow from the publisher: 2.4Ghz core duo, 1GB ram, Shader Model 2.0. What does minimum spec really mean? For me, minimum spec is you can run the game but its slow (even sometimes, painful to play by human standards). Cheers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
Minimum means "minimum to play" no matter what it looks like. If your painfully choppy at your minimum requirements, then your just setting up for bad publicity.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On of the most awkward to support bits of hardware that supports Pixel Shader 2.0 are the old Intel Motherboard built in GPUs - the GMA 900. They don't even have hardware vertex shaders. Not sure if you can get one on a Core Duo motherboard though so you might find the slightly quicker GMA 950 is actually what you need to support.

I'd suggest getting hold of one of those and optimizing the game to work on it. Make sure it has the min spec CPU and RAM too.

One obvious thing to do is to add visual quality settings, for example an option to turn shadows off. Those should be quick and easy to implement, and will help the game run better on lower end hardware.

Your other option is to adjust the min spec.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Since your "minimum spec" is set by your publisher, you need to ask THEM what it really means.


For chipset issues (or for ANY issue) your options are to fix it, work around it, or ship with it. Your publisher might require a fix or workaround, or they may be fine with a compatibility variance.



Fixing it may be easy or hard, depending on what debug information is available.

If your system is well designed you will have enough debug output to trace the problem. It may take a few iterations with QA to fully diagnose it, but that generally isn't too hard.

The worst case will be that you need to bring the specific configuration in to your studio and have some engineers grind away at the problem. In my experience it very rarely comes down to this, only requiring it twice over the course of a decade.


The workaround approach means figuring out what features are slow (with debugging information) and implementing an option to turn them off. It is generally a good idea to have this kind of setting anyway to help the user control their experience.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
generally it needs to run at 30fps or higher on everything above and including the min-spec machine. how you make that happen is up to you (lower rez textures or screen, lower poly models, no anti-aliasing, whatever)

-me

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement