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hamed_gibago

XNA 3.0 and Visual studio 2005

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hamed_gibago    123
Hi my friends I've downloaded XNA 3.0 from microsoft and I have visual studio 2005 is there any way or patch that I can run XNA 3.0 in vs 2005? or I should use vs 2005 or download xna 2? thanks [Edited by - hamed_gibago on November 11, 2009 2:14:37 AM]

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hamed_gibago    123
nobody wants to answer me?
i need help my friends to choose the best way for me
i have a pentium 2 with 300 mg of ram
i want the best way that dont make me so slow and i want to choose the way to learn and start my game project

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Nik02    4348
I'm surprised that you can even run VS2005 itself on that kind of hardware.

Software-wise, the best action would be to upgrade to VS2008 (C# Express will do just fine for XNA) and download XNA GS 3.1.

However, I think that your hardware cannot handle XNA at all - no matter what version - if your display adapter is from the same era as your processor.

If you seriously want to start a game development project with XNA, you should buy a new computer. It doesn't have to be top-of-the-line; any computer available from shops today is better than your current one and should be able to handle XNA.

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Machaira    1033
C# Express 2008 and XNA GS 3.1 are what you'll want to use. You can't use 2005 with 3.0. You'll also need a system with a video card that support shader model 2.0 at a minimum.

I also suggest checking out this FAQ.

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NickGravelyn    855
Quote:
Original post by Machaira
You'll also need a system with a video card that support shader model 2.0 at a minimum.
Incorrect. XNA Game Studio only requires shader model 1.1. Some samples and starter kits use 2.0, but you only need 1.1. See here.

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hamed_gibago    123
my system is so old
i told u cpu is p2 and graphic card is ati 7000 radeon 64 mg
ive done some web application and windows with this system with vs 2005
and ive make some money too
but i know that this system is too old to make games
but i want u my friends to help me to start game programming through another way or tech to start this exciting feild
is there any idea with this system and another tech?
i want to work with this system
if i u want i setup vc++ 6 and start in that way
whats ur idea my friends?

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Nik02    4348
I think that you can't run XNA on that hardware.

You probably can run D3D9 in fixed-function mode, though. You can use it natively in C or C++, or via SlimDX (which is a .net-based library encapsulating DirectX). Note that you're not going to achieve any advanced graphics (by today's standards) with your current machine, but you can definitely develop games per se.

As for C++ - if you go that way, be sure to download the VC++ 2008 Express, which is infinitely better than VC++ 6.

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hamed_gibago    123
which one should i choose?
directx or opengl
which is better for mu situation?
which will be good for future that i can use?
should go another field in game programming like AI or math and physics?

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geekman1009    120
It doesn't matter which you choose, but keep in mind that with DX, you are tied in with Microsoft's Windows OS. Well, that isn't a big problem since there are many, many PCs installed with Windows in the market. OpenGL only expends your prospective market a little bit.

Your main problem now, is what version of Windows would be your targeted market. I'm working in a Computer Aided Learning company and there are still some very old computers used by our clients (as old as Pentium 233), so when I'm developing a software for my company, these oldie-moldies are a tremendous pain for my back side. Since my applications should be designed with Windows 95, 98 and ME in mind, advanced features are out of the question. .Net is out of the question, 3D presentation is out of the question, all I can do is some dull and slow GDI apps.

So, if you are only trying to sell your games to users who still run Win 95 and Win 98 only, well, go with C++ and DX7 or even DX8, you may try DX9 with some luck. But if you are aiming for a more modern PC market (at least Win XP, which I guess will still be around for another 3~5 years), you should get at least a P4 system with a Shader Model 2 display card, and got straight for VC# 2005 + XNA 2.0. A used P4 system should be pretty cheap now, since a lot of them have been phased out of market a year or two ago when Vista came out.

And lastly, please make up your mind and decide whether you want to be a solo indie game developer (you make the whole game by yourself) or be a part of a team (you concentrate on a specific field of game development), since knowing what you really want to do could save you a lot of time and effort.

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jackolantern1    158
Visual C++ 6 is no longer available. How about Python? I have not used it myself, but tons of people around here use and suggest it with PyGame. I think there are some fairly CPU-light development tools that you can use with Python also. Using your current computer, I would not get Visual Studio 2008, particularly if you still plan to make web and windows applications. WPF (the new Windows form platform) will definitely not work considering that it almost didn't work on my old P3 2.3 GHz computer with 1 gig of RAM.

EDIT: Geekman, I would assume that most of those people using Pentium 233 computers with Windows 95/98 aren't playing games on them. They would have given up trying to play current games or gotten a new computer about 8 years ago. So I would not really figure Windows 95/98/ME are a consideration to game developers these days. No one I knows takes them into consideration. The oldest Windows version I have heard anyone worrying about is 2000, which can use some modern features, including some versions of .NET.

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geekman1009    120
@jackolantern1: yes, that's true for most of the cases, but not for me. I some times have to write Edutainment software for those clients, so all I can do is some very limited mini games based on GDI APIs. I think games developed based on DirectX 7 can still run properly on those machines. I made an attempt once with DX7 on those machines, and have a basic game framework running, but was told to cancel the game, due to technicians facing problem updating the display driver (S3 Savage IIRC).

Of course the OP need not go to such extreme measure, since he have got a P2 + Radeon 7000. However, there is no way he could develop a game such as Crysis (Ok, I admit this is an extreme example) on that machines, right? If he is developing his game on a P2, then he is going to develop a game suitable to run on P2, newer machines may be able to run his game, probably with some compatibility issues, but still, his game will not be able to take advantages of the resources of newer system.

Anyway, I doubt his system can run XNA at all, as R7000 is not supporting Shaders.

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hamed_gibago    123
ok my friends
first of all i have to say thank you my friends for helping me and writing your advices and ideas
thanks for everything
so i resault that there is no way to start game developing until i get a new pc
and if i want to start learning game programming with this computer its waste of my time

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hamed_gibago    123
Quote:
Original post by geekman1009
It doesn't matter which you choose, but keep in mind that with DX, you are tied in with Microsoft's Windows OS. Well, that isn't a big problem since there are many, many PCs installed with Windows in the market. OpenGL only expends your prospective market a little bit.

Your main problem now, is what version of Windows would be your targeted market. I'm working in a Computer Aided Learning company and there are still some very old computers used by our clients (as old as Pentium 233), so when I'm developing a software for my company, these oldie-moldies are a tremendous pain for my back side. Since my applications should be designed with Windows 95, 98 and ME in mind, advanced features are out of the question. .Net is out of the question, 3D presentation is out of the question, all I can do is some dull and slow GDI apps.

So, if you are only trying to sell your games to users who still run Win 95 and Win 98 only, well, go with C++ and DX7 or even DX8, you may try DX9 with some luck. But if you are aiming for a more modern PC market (at least Win XP, which I guess will still be around for another 3~5 years), you should get at least a P4 system with a Shader Model 2 display card, and got straight for VC# 2005 + XNA 2.0. A used P4 system should be pretty cheap now, since a lot of them have been phased out of market a year or two ago when Vista came out.

And lastly, please make up your mind and decide whether you want to be a solo indie game developer (you make the whole game by yourself) or be a part of a team (you concentrate on a specific field of game development), since knowing what you really want to do could save you a lot of time and effort.


thanks for ur writing
it makes me so aware to choose my target and go through that
i want to start in a specific field and be pro in that
is that a good choose?
i want to now your opinion.

and something else
im in Iran and there is no game industrial here and no copyright rule here
i will come out of the country about 2 or 3 years later
so according to these situations is that good choice?

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geekman1009    120
as long as you put in your best effort and keep it up, you can do well in what ever field you decide to work in, at least that is what I believe. :)

As for piracy, it's not much better here in my country (Malaysia). In fact, it's much worse than Iran in comparison, since computers are much commonly used and it's not hard for any one to get a decent computer at affordable price here, so people just pirate software as much as they want.

I myself would not want to be an independent game developer here, at least I will not try to sell my games locally.

My advice for you, Hamed, is try to learn as much about game development as you could, before you concentrate in any specific field. It's always a plus to know more about game development even if you are focusing on only specific area. Even if are only focusing on AI, and if you really know what could be done and what not in a game, surely you could design better AI for the game, i.e. not hogging all the resources to achieve your perfect AI routine.

Just use these 2 to 3 years to learn all the aspects of game development and possibly make a full game that cover as much aspects as you could (Game logic, sound, input, graphics, 3D rendering, AI, physics, story presentations etc.), so you have more fields to choose from when you want to go professional in any of them. Besides, a complete game, while may not be profitable in your current area, would be a good addition to your resume when you go job seeking in oversea.

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Nik02    4348
Do note that it is perfectly possible to develop games on your current machine too, just not fancy-looking ones by today's standards.

Games are more than just graphics - in fact, gameplay is usually what separates good games from bad ones. You can start your career by programming 2D games now, and later port your acquired knowledge to 3D when you've got better equipment.

Regardless of your tools, learning game development is difficult. If you decide to pursue it as a career, I wish you good luck and a lot of patience!

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hamed_gibago    123
Quote:
Original post by geekman1009
as long as you put in your best effort and keep it up, you can do well in what ever field you decide to work in, at least that is what I believe. :)

As for piracy, it's not much better here in my country (Malaysia). In fact, it's much worse than Iran in comparison, since computers are much commonly used and it's not hard for any one to get a decent computer at affordable price here, so people just pirate software as much as they want.

I myself would not want to be an independent game developer here, at least I will not try to sell my games locally.

My advice for you, Hamed, is try to learn as much about game development as you could, before you concentrate in any specific field. It's always a plus to know more about game development even if you are focusing on only specific area. Even if are only focusing on AI, and if you really know what could be done and what not in a game, surely you could design better AI for the game, i.e. not hogging all the resources to achieve your perfect AI routine.

Just use these 2 to 3 years to learn all the aspects of game development and possibly make a full game that cover as much aspects as you could (Game logic, sound, input, graphics, 3D rendering, AI, physics, story presentations etc.), so you have more fields to choose from when you want to go professional in any of them. Besides, a complete game, while may not be profitable in your current area, would be a good addition to your resume when you go job seeking in oversea.


thanks for answering fast
u make me so anxious to start thanks i think that way u say is the best
learn learn and learn as possible as i can and make a complete game for my experience
thanks very much for the advice

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hamed_gibago    123
Quote:
Original post by Nik02
Do note that it is perfectly possible to develop games on your current machine too, just not fancy-looking ones by today's standards.

Games are more than just graphics - in fact, gameplay is usually what separates good games from bad ones. You can start your career by programming 2D games now, and later port your acquired knowledge to 3D when you've got better equipment.

Regardless of your tools, learning game development is difficult. If you decide to pursue it as a career, I wish you good luck and a lot of patience!


thanks my friend
i've thought about that before
i accept that and thats true
thanks for the advice

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