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Basic?

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Ok, I have some (started but never finished learning or just using (so forgot) in these langauges. Html/javascript Perl/Php/ruby and C/C++/C# i've tried Qbasic and Pascal. I like basic but i quit learning cause qbasic is old and isn't supported by newer system. So what is a good basic Dialect to learn? I want to make Games and eventioally go to C++

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basic and c based languages are two different ball games. programming is programming but you may experience a learning curve when switching from based to a c based language. you'll also have difficulty finding resources for visual basic game development compared to a c based language.

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wich one then would be a good one to learn? like what is easy yet powerful for games i hope to make like a doom game or something within 4 years

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DarkBasic Professional has an advertisement-driven version for free. It includes the abilities to make 3d graphics easily.

Once you move up to C++ there is a free library called Dark GDK that comes with Microsoft Visual C++ Express Edition that is based on DarkBasic's runtime libraries.

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Python is my recommendation. But really, whatever you choose stick with it until you are reasonably comfortable it. Your goal shouldn't be to learn Language X rather to learn how to program, and learning to program is largely independent of what language you use. Some languages encourage certain ways of thinking about programming (some of which might be more suited to you than others) and some will throw more obstacles in your way as you try to understand programming, but any reasonable language can get you there in the end.

In my experience, Python provides a good mix of:
-few obstacles between you and learning to program
-encouraging you to use techniques you wouldn't find if you just stuck to C or C++
-and practical usefulness (large standard library, well supported and adopted, plenty of libraries, etc.).

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Python is a good choice. C# with XNA is another possibility.

Whichever you go for, I agree with Ezbez's recommendation to learn how to program rather than a particular language.

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Of the two go for VB.Net. VB6 is an option along with anything else but it's old and, according to Wikipedia, Microsoft no longer support it at all.

VB.Net tools are free to download, guyver23 posted the link to them above.

My own recommendation is C# or Python, but I lean more toward C# personally.

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Frankly, I wouldn't recommend VB for anything -- It's basically a dead-end language: support for pre-.NET VB isn't around, and VB.Net itself offers no advantage over C# in ease-of-use. I'm convinced that it only exists in the first place to placate Microsoft's business customers who were worried that their VB-centric programming staff would demand more money if they had to program in something that looked more like C.

I also wouldn't recommend any of the commercial BASICs (Like DarkBasic) -- They're good enough for what they are, but you're somewhat tied into their mindset of doing things a certain way, from what I understand of them.

At this point it may sound like I'm against BASIC, but that couldn't be further from the truth. I cut my teeth at programming primariy with QuickBASIC 4.5 (the most popular version that had a compiler to produce real executables) and it was a fine language for learning and for getting things done.

A modern replacement for QuickBASIC is FreeBASIC, which is about 98% compatible with the QuickBASIC 4.5 syntax, supports basic OOP principles and a flat memory model (one of the QB 4.5 headaches that is gladly gone). Last I checked, they had compilers for Windows and Linux, and they were working on a Mac port. Best of all, its free, as in both speech and beer.

My ultimate recommendation though, is probably C# -- its really quite a joy to use. I hadn't touched C# in nearly 3 years (and from that time long ago I only had about 6 months with it) but I've recently had to pick it back up again for work. Granted that I have a good deal of programming background in general, but I can honestly say that jumping straight into the deep end of the language has presented no real hurdles. I'm using basically every advanced and new feature of C# -- Linq, Lambda Functions, Expression Trees, Extension Methods, Reflection and everything else. Linq alone, which I've been doing a lot of work with, is probably the coolest thing to hit a mainstream programming language in a very long time.

The things I dislike about C# are the little things I find that differ from C++ for no apparent reason or gain: For example, the lack of method level static variables both perplexes and annoys me, as it destroys my ability to manage the scope of the variable as I see fit, but I'll concede that more annoyance than a real issue. Library support is great with C# -- You get all of the .Net framework libraries of course, then there's XNA, SlimDX and Tao for all your gaming and multimedia needs. Take a look at the recent image-of-the-day posts -- Two of them have implemented Carmack's Mega-texture technique in C# -- Clear proof that C# can do some impressive things.

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