• Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  

What do you think of this skill system?

This topic is 2966 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

I don't feel like typing up the entire system so I will break it down into the essentials so you get the gist of it. First you have action/move slots similar to what buttons you have on current action bars in other mmo's. These slots are treated like macros with a given number of lines/skill slots. Example: [action slot name]- 1. skill 1 2. skill 2 3. skill 3 and so on These skills are taught by players and npcs. This teaching system works similar to a master/apprentice system. The rarity of the skills or the more "cool" skills will be harder to find (the npc) or the npc will have harder/stricter requirements for teaching the skill to you. Sometimes they just won't teach it to you for. Each of these trainers have 5 teaching slots. When a player is accepted as an apprentice to learn the skill then the teaching slot number will be reduced by 1 thus only allowing the npc to teach 4 other people. If the player fails to learn or complete his apprenticeship in a given amount of time then they will fail the apprenticeship and it will give that 1 teaching slot back to the npc. Once all 5 or whatever # of teaching slots are all used up then that npc cannot teach that skill to any other players. The players that learned that skill can be given the option to teaching that skill to other players. This is entirely decided upon having a skill with teaching slots. Normally the skills are only teachable 2 times. The first being the npc that teaches the player, and the second being the player teaching another player. The third player who receives the skill will have no teaching slots and thus can't teach it to anybody else. Similar to how npcs teach their skills to players there will be a contract type system where elements for being taught the skill are given up front (for players teaching players). This keeps both side honest and not leave it up to the sole whim of the person with the skill in the first place and breaking his agreements with people (abusing the system). The skills noted above do not have skill points or levels attached to them as they will only be used to create more moves/actions. The usable skills as you see in other skill based games are in a separate area. These skill do work off skill points and there are two ways to gain skills in the game. The first is the active system which is the usage/grind system where you get points for using the weapons/skill. For now we have set this at 1 point every 5 minutes of use. The second feature is the passive skill point system where you are given 1pt every 5 minutes for having a paid subscription account. This feature is linked to the paid account because we are offering the game for free for download and will work like F2P games but the bulk of the content will only be available to the paying players and this is an incentive for people to pay. This also works nicely for casual players because every time they log in they will have more skill points to spend and won't be that far behind hardcore players. Yet the more active players still get rewarded by the active system simply because they play longer. The usable skills will work in a tree format that looks like this: General Skills(0)- + Character (0) + Corporation/Guild (0) + Crafting/Professions (0) - Combat (0) .....+Melee(0) .....+Spell(0) .....-Ranged(0) ........+Pistols(0) ........+Assault Rifles(0) ........-Machine Guns(0) ............-Machine Gun #1 .................Skill #1 .................Skill #2 .................Skill #3 *Sorry for the bullets but the editor doesn't like spaces/tabs The important thing to remember about the usage skills is that they do not directly affect stats in this game (ie. +stam, +dmg, +intel, +energy). Instead they affect attributes that lead to those things. Take accuracy for example, instead of giving +accuracy, we give you skills like "Hold breath time", "recoil control", "weapon bob" and others that lead to better accuracy. Each weapon has about 7 skills on average, each of these skills have 10 levels. Example: [Machine Gun #1]- ........{Breath Control} [1][2][3][4][5][[6]][[7]][[8]][[9]][[10]] Each skill level takes more skill points to activate: 10 for #1, 30 for #2, 50 for #3, 2000 for #10 or something to that effect. The first 5ish levels of the skill are not subject to skill decay. Skill levels 6-10 are subject to decay if they are not used. This mimics the real life way of becoming rusty at using the weapon. It's not like you just forget how to use it but you will not be as sharp as you were in your prime. If you notice the skill tree above all the names have (0) after their names. This is a skill point pool where points can be stored. So by using Machine Gun #1 then the skill points you earn will go into Machine Gun #1 skill point pool. You can either spend the points inside of machine gun #1 or trade 100 skill points for 1 point in the upper tier, in this case Machine Guns(0). You can do this for every tier, until you get to the top at general skills. General skills are the most valuable because they can be used anywhere in the skill tree. Passive skill points will be general skill points. Just another incentive. In the beginning of the game you will be given a set amount of skill points (say 1,000 or so). These points are able to be returned to you at any time so you can respect for any reason at no cost to the player. This allows players to try different outfits and find out what they want without having to remake their character. All other points earn will be one-time use points where once they are spent they can not be given back. It will of course prompt the user to determine that they are sure they want to do this action. This is the keep people from respecing continually to best suit their given situation and not have to think and be creative in finding solutions. (More tactics than gear setup) As far as the Move/action slot skills I'll give you an example of how to create a fireball spell. {My Fireball} - You can name your move slots whatever you want 1. Spell Element <Fire> - tells the system that you are using fire for the spell 2. Spell Shape <Ball> - tells the system that this effect will be in ball form 3. Spell Power <40%> - this sets the amount of energy you pour into the spell, thus 40% of your maximum energy bar. This is actually optional as you can set your power bar manually (on the fly). Having this skill will however override a manual setting. This is also important because say this basic fireball costs 100 energy to cast (minimum requirements) but you put 400 energy into it. Thus your fireball will be bigger and do more damage/effect because it has more force because of the extra energy. You can put however much energy into the spell as you have or can get. 4. Spell Origination <Left Hand> - denotes the spell will be on cast from your left hand. Could be whole body, foot, head, eyes, etc.... This is just a simple example of a basic fireball but i'm sure you can see the possibilities in such a system and give more options you can make tons of spells. You will also be able to combine spell effects and thus get different results from your spells. Such as mixing a fire spell on your left hand with a water spell on your right hand and getting anything from fire to steam to hot water to ice. So what do you think? What do you think could be improved? I'm always open to constructive review.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
I don't have time right now to comment on this whole system as your post is fairly in depth, but a couple of points:

Your mentoring system is somewhat realistic, but effectively creates a queue of players waiting to learn skills - Is there a formal queuing system? And more importantly, would this actually be fun?

Secondly, your active skill improvement system sounds similar to that in Oblivion etc. - how do you prevent players simply spamming a skill to increase its level? This certainly isn't a fun thing to do, but is certain to happen unless you devise some mechanism which prevents or sufficiently discourages this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by WavyVirus
I don't have time right now to comment on this whole system as your post is fairly in depth, but a couple of points:

Your mentoring system is somewhat realistic, but effectively creates a queue of players waiting to learn skills - Is there a formal queuing system? And more importantly, would this actually be fun?

Secondly, your active skill improvement system sounds similar to that in Oblivion etc. - how do you prevent players simply spamming a skill to increase its level? This certainly isn't a fun thing to do, but is certain to happen unless you devise some mechanism which prevents or sufficiently discourages this.


To your first point: a given npc skill trainer has a set # of teaching slots that the game/dev team designates. Once all those slots are used up, that npc can no longer teach anybody. The backend system (server/game) will select/create another npc given a certain criteria such as hard to find or whatever and will give the new npc the ability to teach the skill. There is no queue system because if there is no apprentice slots available then you won't be able to be taught.

You will have to either find the new trainer with the skills, or find one of the players who was taught the skill that you want. This makes other players valuable to other players. This also helps combat online wiki sites that try and explain everything about the game in minute detail. So this way, the focus would be on finding the skill trainer/getting him to teach you and the information would only be valuable for a short period of time (ie. the time it takes for the apprentice slots to fill up. You also get into more things like people who do find the skills only will tell select friends or guild mates, so it pays to know people. Also some skills taught by npcs cannot be taught again (for really rare skills).

The whole point of this type of system is that it allows us to grant all the skill access to people (potentially) and their 1 major obstacle is simply finding the trainer and getting him/her/it to teach the skill to you. Or you could locate a past trainer, get info on his students (other players) then seek them out and hope to convince them to teach you their skills if they can. Then would I think make a stronger community and get away from grouping just to use other people to meet your own ends (that is inherent in WoW and other games).

We want you to get to know the other players and actually have conversations and make good friends. This also makes it so you don't run into the whole notion of "everybody can have everything" thus denoting that nobody will be unique and then the familiar concept of the tank mage starts to pop up. This can't happen because people will all have a variety of skills but our combat system doesn't use the Holy Trinity of Tank, Healer, DPS model and it is gear towards anybody in any gear with any setup can play together. It doesn't rely on skills being x or you having x tier gear or y level. You simply have to find other people to play with. This also is really great for friends because you can your friend who just started the game can play from day 1 and not spend that time grinding his level to get him "useful".

To the 2nd point: the skill system itself discourages the use of macro programs or bots because even though it will give them skill points it will not make them significantly stronger than other players. This is because we have removed all the other elements that cause the player power gap and took away all the +% dodge/crit/hit/miss etc.. so anybody can cause damage to anybody else. All in all a player with 0 skill points has almost the same chance of killing something as a person with 10,000,000,000 skill points (or max), it doesn't matter really. If you are looking for a number its really only like a 1-2% difference if even that. Most of the survivability of the player is dependent on the player using items in various combination's and out maneuvering the other opponents strategically. So people can spam all they want, buy their characters from ebay or have them power-leveled but it will not make a difference in who wins or loses a fight.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Nikkon
To your first point: a given npc skill trainer has a set # of teaching slots that the game/dev team designates. Once all those slots are used up, that npc can no longer teach anybody.


OK, I didn't notice that the NPC cannot teach more players once the first set are finished training. This solves the queueing problem, but I suspect would still be very difficult to implement without frustrating players who just miss the chance to train with an NPC by a second or two..

Quote:
Original post by Nikkon
To the 2nd point: the skill system itself discourages the use of macro programs or bots because even though it will give them skill points it will not make them significantly stronger than other players.


I wasn't referring to macro programs or bots, or even the idea that players could become disproportionately powerful - simply that a player told that a skill is improved by using it often tends to use the skill ad nauseam to fulfil their natural urge to improve their character, even to the detriment of their enjoyment of the game.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Nikkon
All in all a player with 0 skill points has almost the same chance of killing something as a person with 10,000,000,000 skill points (or max), it doesn't matter really.
The question follows, then, why have skills and points at all, if they don't really provide a benefit to the player?

You have also removed the primary motivation for grinding (i.e. character advancement), so how do you plan to keep customers engaged?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by swiftcoder
Quote:
Original post by Nikkon
All in all a player with 0 skill points has almost the same chance of killing something as a person with 10,000,000,000 skill points (or max), it doesn't matter really.
The question follows, then, why have skills and points at all, if they don't really provide a benefit to the player?

You have also removed the primary motivation for grinding (i.e. character advancement), so how do you plan to keep customers engaged?


@WavyVirus: If you take the current grading system of gear (white,green,blue,purple,orange (common thru legendary) and apply them to skills then you get varying rates at which players obtain the items, in this case skills. Mostly white thru blue will be fairly easy to acquire but epic and legendary will be hard since they are called epic and legendary. I want players to have a real reward when they find an epic or legendary skill, something that is almost unique to the server, not having everybody and their brother doing the same skill as it takes away from the importance of getting it. All of the common and uncommon skills will be located in population centers such as cities/towns/villages and will have npc trainers with high to unlimited teaching slots, so those skills get dispersed easily. But we don't want to make the epic or legendary ones as easy because then they might as well be called common or boring.

I think that leaving up to luck/skill/deduction/problem solving of the player is a lot better system than "go farm this boss xyz times for a piece of gear that has 1/1,000,000,000th drop rate". If we find that some skills people are having a hard time getting because other people get their first and it becomes a problem them we could easily just increase the number of npcs in the world that teach that skill.

About the skills: think of them more of a bonus or add-on to the real content. We really don't want players to focus too much of their time messing with skill points because that is not the point of the game. The game is not grinding skill points to make a stronger character, the game is to have fun playing the way you play. This is why we give the players skill points through the passive skill point system in hopes that it will lessen the need to focus on "I must grind until my eyes bleed for 1 more skill point." Having the skills does have benefits and it will give you access to more options such as duel wielding or whatever else we can think up, they will just not affect the power level of the player that much.


@SwiftCoder: The primary motivator for character advancement has not been levels or skills, its always been gear. Grind this for this shiny, grind xyz boss because he might drop this or that. Its the carrot on the stick that has always be with us. If you take a level 80 character in WoW and strip all his gear, can you do any of the level 80 content? Did your character get stronger or did his gear? This is because it is a lot easier to show the illusion of advancement through gear than it is through real character advancement.

So much importance has been placed on gear this or gear that, that many people don't even no what character advancement is anymore. I wonder how many people actually raid because they like the dungeon environment or the super awesome boss fight that is a true experience and not some one watching raid bars and timers and getting the routine down, figuring out the gimmick trick to survive and have mob AI that is stupider than a doorbell. This is not epic, this is not memorable, this is tedium of making people run a treadmill over and over and using gear as the carrot.

Gear will still have the cool factor, the awesome looks, the "hey look at how bada** i am" but it will not become the overwhelming focus of the game. Also because we are sporting a 100% crafting economy many more people will be crafting rather than grinding some boss somewhere but that is up to them.

This is where epic story lines that keep you wanting more, on the edge of your seat through every plot twist or turn. When you didn't expect something to happen, knew that she was going to betray you but couldn't quite except it. Going to a forbidden temple that nobody else in the game has every found like something out of an Indiana Jones movie. This is a world full of adventure, not a treadmill running theme-park with the same rides over and over.

We have a planet for siege warfare where massive bases fight for territory, we have a planet that hosts a coliseum where pvp is actually a challenge and you get a chance to have your name sealed in history for the entirety of the game through status and lore and so on. We have a sociable planet that has the pubs and dancing rooms and is generally made for people who like to sit and talk. We have a desert planet that hosts a huge trading bizarre where people go to buy and sell their goods. We have an ice planet that is purely meant for exploration. We want you to go about and then say in chat "guys, I think I just found a city!". All of this wrapped around a shroud of mystery of who your character is and what happened? We actually give all the characters a back-story but leave it open for them to take over and make it their own story. Are you a clone? a super soldier? some weird thing found in a test tube? Where is that planet they got you from, what happened to it? What is this device i keep hearing rumors about, what does it do?

You can hunt other people through bounty quests/missions, you can be a trader, a merchant, a peddler, a soldier, a bandit, a thief, a rogue. Break the law and people will actively hunt you down (npcs included) giving you the real feel of being on the run from the law. There is multiple cities that cater to both sides of justice or the underworld. All players can fight all other players. You can commit mutiny and they will despise you for it for the rest of the game. These are real consequences for your actions that are not laid out for you to get a slap on the wrist for slaughtering 10,000 people.

I hope you see that there is a lot more than just "Gear Grinding"

[Edited by - Nikkon on December 2, 2009 10:32:41 AM]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
well hmmm, I guess the world just up and ran out of opinions. Did something happen on the latest show of American Idol I don't know about?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Nikkon

Each weapon has about 7 skills on average, each of these skills have 10 levels.
...
Each skill level takes more skill points to activate:
10 for #1, 30 for #2, 50 for #3, 2000 for #10 or something to that effect.

7 skills x 10 levels = 70 skill levels.

How long will it take for a player to get all 70 skill levels for their primary weapon? What other skill levels will be feathered into that window of time?

As a starting point, how about maxing out the 70 skill levels for the player's favorite weapon in about three months of playing the game at about 20 hours/week.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Your skill tree systems has similarities to one I have been working on. I have general skill groups, which have skills, which when coupled with one of the ability scores determines how well your character can do something. Points can be allocated in either the groups or the skills themselves.

I thing to watch out for. This kind of system looks pretty scary to gamers just starting your game, and it is more difficult to balance.

Also previously mentioned, a system where your skills improve by practicing them tends to be abused if there aren't any reasonable constrants. Many people consider the leveling system in Oblivion to be broken because how easy it is to 'spam' abilities and the ability to 'underlevel'.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Platinum314
Your skill tree systems has similarities to one I have been working on. I have general skill groups, which have skills, which when coupled with one of the ability scores determines how well your character can do something. Points can be allocated in either the groups or the skills themselves.

I thing to watch out for. This kind of system looks pretty scary to gamers just starting your game, and it is more difficult to balance.

Also previously mentioned, a system where your skills improve by practicing them tends to be abused if there aren't any reasonable constrants. Many people consider the leveling system in Oblivion to be broken because how easy it is to 'spam' abilities and the ability to 'underlevel'.


To the point about looking scary: I'm not going to show you this huge list of every item that has skills attached to it. There is no point in doing that. The skill system will only show skills for the weapons that you have used. So in the beginning the skill tree will be very compact and short, showing only 1-5 skills.

Skills help the character do things better but in very small and indirect ways. This is the complete opposite of what most skill based games do. You don't have to have skills to be functional in the game but having the skills adds more flavor to it. So I really don't have to worry about people spamming their skills because it won't matter, if they consider that fun then by all means they are welcome to do it but this game doesn't make it mandatory to determine your characters strength/survivability.

Balance is a whole another issue and it encompasses a lot more than just a single skill system and goes into everything in the game which is more than i care to type :)

I am simply going off sliding scales like protection ------- agility or weight ----speed and many more. So you basically have trade offs like you do in real life where you can pick anywhere in the scale and you would have a 50/50 chance to beat another person. So take any gear, any skill, any whatever and you'd still have a 50/50 chance. This is the balance I'm going for with the x factor being the player (IE. skill of the player and his strategy)

Being faster doesn't mean you are going to win, being stronger doesn't mean your going to win, being in one gear that you think is better doesn't mean you are going to win.


@AngleWyrm

From the fuzzy math that I have worked out when i first made this system i went off the notion of 1 point every 5 minutes forever. (passive system). To max out a single skill would take 2 days and an entire weapon in about 14 days. The time to max out 100 weapons would take you around 4 years to accomplish. Given this is only the passive system you could take everything and cut the time in half given players will be gaining points from their active grinding.

I highly doubt that people would only stick with 1 weapon as the best weapon for whatever setup you are trying to run is very subject and dependent on your play-style. Weapons also have many pros and cons and the best will change depending on the situation that the player will be in, so they will have and use multiple weapons and those weapons will change as their play style changes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Nikkon
Skills help the character do things better but in very small and indirect ways. This is the complete opposite of what most skill based games do. You don't have to have skills to be functional in the game but having the skills adds more flavor to it. So I really don't have to worry about people spamming their skills because it won't matter, if they consider that fun then by all means they are welcome to do it but this game doesn't make it mandatory to determine your characters strength/survivability.


I still think you're missing the point here - just because your skills have little impact on gameplay doesn't mean that this problem won't exist. A conditioned player of games will effectively have a psychological propensity to spam these skills because they are used to improving their character as much and as quickly as possible. They will not do it because they find it fun, but simply because they can (often to the detriment of their enjoyment of the game). It is the building of their character and seeing them become more powerful which attracts many gamers to the genre, and probably keeps the majority of them playing for any length of time.

The point is not that a player will spam skills and become too powerful, but that they will spam skills because increasing skill points is basically the point of many games - you say it "won't matter", but I think that players spamming skills is a problem even if it doesn't unbalance the game. Even if skills give little reward, many players these days will naturally attempt to "max out" their character - it is an almost uncontrollable urge.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by WavyVirus

I still think you're missing the point here - just because your skills have little impact on gameplay doesn't mean that this problem won't exist. A conditioned player of games will effectively have a psychological propensity to spam these skills because they are used to improving their character as much and as quickly as possible. They will not do it because they find it fun, but simply because they can (often to the detriment of their enjoyment of the game). It is the building of their character and seeing them become more powerful which attracts many gamers to the genre, and probably keeps the majority of them playing for any length of time.

The point is not that a player will spam skills and become too powerful, but that they will spam skills because increasing skill points is basically the point of many games - you say it "won't matter", but I think that players spamming skills is a problem even if it doesn't unbalance the game. Even if skills give little reward, many players these days will naturally attempt to "max out" their character - it is an almost uncontrollable urge.


I get what you are saying WavyVirus but you are asking for a system or something to change the conditioning of the players from past games or experiences. The only way to truly remove this would be to completely remove it from the game, which is something I don't want to do. I went for the next best option of changing the environment and how the game is designed to encourage less importance on the skills and hopefully it will reverse that past conditioning. That and by putting the skills on 1 pt every 5 minutes of use I am actually forcing people to slow down without having it be too painful because I would like them to focus on other parts of the game.

Other than that I am working on other ways to actually show the player advancement that is more noticeable than just their improvement at controlling their character and use of strategic tactics. This has been a big issue since day one because we got rid of level dings or skill dings.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This type of skill system isn't the sort I'd like to see in a game myself - (I'm very particular of what I want in any type of cRPG system) - but it should work.

The one area I don't like the look of, however, is the method of learning the skills to begin with. In my opinion, anything that can get in the way of a player doing something they need to do in a game, especially for arbitrary reasons, shouldn't really exist.

In other words, I'd like you to take a step back and have another look at your system: split into two parts - one the player controls and one the computer program controls, and then see how they interact - which side is more important, the player, or the computer? If it's the latter, then that's not what we should be looking for...

(FYI I have my own cRPG system, in which I've tried to give as much power and influence as possible to the player, without making it imbalanced, and unfortuantely, have yet to see any system even try to do the same thing to the same degree elsewhere, but then, I'm very particular about what I class as a cRPG, (for good reason)).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by DarrenTomlyn
This type of skill system isn't the sort I'd like to see in a game myself - (I'm very particular of what I want in any type of cRPG system) - but it should work.

The one area I don't like the look of, however, is the method of learning the skills to begin with. In my opinion, anything that can get in the way of a player doing something they need to do in a game, especially for arbitrary reasons, shouldn't really exist.

In other words, I'd like you to take a step back and have another look at your system: split into two parts - one the player controls and one the computer program controls, and then see how they interact - which side is more important, the player, or the computer? If it's the latter, then that's not what we should be looking for...

(FYI I have my own cRPG system, in which I've tried to give as much power and influence as possible to the player, without making it imbalanced, and unfortuantely, have yet to see any system even try to do the same thing to the same degree elsewhere, but then, I'm very particular about what I class as a cRPG, (for good reason)).



I've reread your post a couple of times but I'm not sure if I understand what you are trying to say...

You mention mention that you don't like how you obtain skills in the first place, are you talking about how you obtain usable skills by using a weapon which adds the skill to the skill list, moving the move/technique skills that have to be learned from npcs/player trainers, or the active and passive skill point generation where you get skill points for your usable skill?

Which one or maybe all of them you are trying mention but what do you find to be arbitrary, or gets in the way of what the player is doing? What does the player "need" to be doing?


Toward the splitting between the player and the computer, I'm not understanding how their is a difference because most of the game's actions are facilitated through the computer but I'm making it to where players can also become a source of content. The player is always more important because it is them who I want to have fun and enjoy the game. I am using the computer section though to extend the possible options that could be given to the player.

The game also doesn't try and give the player the most power (if you mean it in terms of strength) but maximum player freedom.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Nikkon

I've reread your post a couple of times but I'm not sure if I understand what you are trying to say...

You mention mention that you don't like how you obtain skills in the first place, are you talking about how you obtain usable skills by using a weapon which adds the skill to the skill list, moving the move/technique skills that have to be learned from npcs/player trainers, or the active and passive skill point generation where you get skill points for your usable skill?

Which one or maybe all of them you are trying mention but what do you find to be arbitrary, or gets in the way of what the player is doing? What does the player "need" to be doing?


Toward the splitting between the player and the computer, I'm not understanding how their is a difference because most of the game's actions are facilitated through the computer but I'm making it to where players can also become a source of content. The player is always more important because it is them who I want to have fun and enjoy the game. I am using the computer section though to extend the possible options that could be given to the player.

The game also doesn't try and give the player the most power (if you mean it in terms of strength) but maximum player freedom.


(Sorry it's taken me a while to respond - I've been far too busy...).

It's this part of your text I have a problem with:

Quote:
These skills are taught by players and npcs. This teaching system works similar to a master/apprentice system. The rarity of the skills or the more "cool" skills will be harder to find (the npc) or the npc will have harder/stricter requirements for teaching the skill to you. Sometimes they just won't teach it to you for. Each of these trainers have 5 teaching slots.

When a player is accepted as an apprentice to learn the skill then the teaching slot number will be reduced by 1 thus only allowing the npc to teach 4 other people. If the player fails to learn or complete his apprenticeship in a given amount of time then they will fail the apprenticeship and it will give that 1 teaching slot back to the npc. Once all 5 or whatever # of teaching slots are all used up then that npc cannot teach that skill to any other players. The players that learned that skill can be given the option to teaching that skill to other players. This is entirely decided upon having a skill with teaching slots. Normally the skills are only teachable 2 times. The first being the npc that teaches the player, and the second being the player teaching another player. The third player who receives the skill will have no teaching slots and thus can't teach it to anybody else.



There are three things a game requires, (though most computer games have four):

1. Something for the player (or players) to control and write their own story with.
2. A setting within which a game takes place.
3. A set of rules binding the two together, adding an element of competition if not involving multiple competitive players.
4. (optional) An/some artificial players/entities which also compete with the player to write their own story.

Games are about, and are therefore defined by, the types of story a player WRITES, and the media used to do so where applicable - (which in this case would be the computer itself, and maybe it's operating system) - (i.e. the flip-side of art, which is defined by the types of story TOLD, and the media used to do so).

What you must understand, is that any story the game has to TELL within it's setting, i.e. anything that happens TO the player, apart from commentary, (i.e. reporting on something the game has done on the players behalf), must be interleaved with the story the player writes.

what you are telling me in the above paragraphs, is that when the player wants to write the story of his character gaining a skill, which he can do so according to the rules of the game, they then need to wait for the game to TELL them whether or not they can do so. In which case, the story being told, outweighs the story the player wants/needs to write. (Which shouldn't be the case for any game really - if it is, then it's just bad design - which unfortunately isn't anything new).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement