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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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dmanwplan

Mentor Volunteers?

3 posts in this topic

Hello there, I've registered only recently to this site. I'm currently interested in game development, I am however not very capable in producing games from my ideas. I was hopeful that one of you characters at this website with far more experience then me, would be willing to be my mentor on this matter. I'm currently most eager to learn and study C++, so I may gain the capabilities to program the computer games. That way I can actually get things to do what I want them to, and such. I currently have some ideas for games, and I'm eager to start learning so that one day I may make them. Sound: I am currently slightly able to make sounds, for games to help in this task. Level Design: Little next to none, I do however have some. I am currently working on a map using Valve's Source SDK Hammer editor. But I'm still a novice so it isn't that great. Modeling: None. Sorry. Materialing: Again, none. Sorry. Programming: Sparse, and not very advanced, or quite even complete basic. My utmost apologies.
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What about games most appeals to you? What elements in a game inspire you the most to be involved in their development? Do you see yourself as creative, attentive to detail or both? These questions would help you be able to pick a goal position such as game artist or QA tester. Check out this article for game development positions.

I will be glad to answer your questions in PMs if you want to be a programmer [C++/DirectX9], game artist or game designer since I love to read, write, create things and work with code. I started early with designing, and I have a couple years of programming under by belt. (no commercial projects) However, I am in college and would certainly not qualify as a pro yet. I'll be happy to talk with you if you need me, but just know I am also learning myself and I won't be afraid to tell you things that may hurt. (I've heard them in this very forum)

Let's leave it at this, I can try to be as much of a mentor as I can be, but remember I am just a stranger elsewhere that will only be able to talk when time allows. Despite my lack of industry experience, I wouldn't post here if I wasn't confident I could help you. Fire over PMs when you are ready, but for a disclaimer, don't be too surprised if I send you back to this forum if I'm not 100% on something. [smile]

Cheers!
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Honestly man, the best thing for you to do is to just pick a subject and run with it. When I got my start in the biz I focused on technology (engineering), and have been able to use it (and UI art & design I picked up along the way) in the industry. And although in my time in I have earned moderate competencies in technical, game, & level design, its a hard road, and there is still alot I don't know. Right now the greatest danger for your is to try to learn it all. It'll take you a few decades, trust me I know.

Specialize first, cause that will get you the job, generalize later, once your already in. Once your in, you'll be able to build a network of colleagues that will be more than happy to show you whatever you'd like to know. (In fact, sometimes the challange is to get them to shut up about it)

Try and pursue a traditional degree, game degree's are cool but if you fail to get in or if it just takes a long time to break-in your in for some hard times. (Not to mention what might happen if you end up hating the job, we do alot of overtime brotha, and we get paid salary not hourly) Besides, you can go out and buy books and other educational material based on what it is your trying to learn. Just takes a bit of planning and self-discipline.

As far as a mentor, what do you think game dev is? If you post a question, chances are someone is going to reply. I myself have gotten stuck (particularly in engineering and in new areas of interest) and where do you think I go? Here. If your curious, ask a question. Someone is either gonna explain it to you or point you in a direction where you can learn more, if not both. Just remember, every member of this online community shares a love of video games, be it as a hobby or a profession. Makes it a useful asset, use it. I wish you the best man, see you in the forums.
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I am surprised no one has mentioned the "Adopt a Newb" program that has been going on in the Help Wanted forum. Check it out, post that you are looking for a mentor, and you will likely get one as long as you are patient. There are quite a few more people looking for mentors than there are mentors, so it may take a little bit. However, there is a lot of experience and guidance being given out.
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