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GCX-15

Study filmmaking or programming?

11 posts in this topic

I'm trying to make a few 'movie' games in the same style as Metal Gear Solid 4 but I don't know what to study. Looking at the cut scenes in Uncharted 2 for instance it looks pretty amateur, maybe the makers weren't involved with film directing. I don't want that to happen with my games. I want the cut scenes to be fairly good so I'm wondering if I should specialise more in filmmaking than programming?
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G, don't waste time worrying about what you DON'T want. Spend your time instead studying what you WANT to study.
If you want to study filmmaking, then you should!
If you are a computer nerd and you want to study programming, then go for it.
Take classes in both if you want. You can always take classes in whatever other topic you want to.
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By study, do you mean a college education? You can always take electives to round out your knowledge. Its not like you pick your line of study and are never allowed to stray from it.
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What do you want to do? It is up to you, members at a forum from which you have no idea who they really are should not have anything to say about what kind of study you want to study (weird sentence, I'm sorry but where I live it is drinking time). For what you may known there all drunken 14 year olds who try to screw you over for live. Just think about what you really want, do you want to make movies? Or do you want to make games? Where I live you can always take a minor. There should be a man (or woman) at your school who is specialized at helping you find the study you want to do, I guess you should pay him a visit.

Mind my English, if I screw up the rest of your life don't blame me!

Tjaalie,
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If you want to make cut-scenes, go and study film making.

I hate most cut-scenes in games, because they are boring and non-interactive. I don't know why anyone who wants to make games wants to have the player sitting down and do nothing, just for the sake of some backgroundstory.
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I originally wanted to make some movies but then realised it was impossible because the characters would not look like the way I imagined them, and also the sets didn't really seem possible. So I had the idea that I would turn them into games, and I really liked Meryl from MGS4 and want to create characters like her in games. I'm not into making gameplay.
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Quote:
Original post by GCX-15
I originally wanted to make some movies... I had the idea that I would turn them into games, and I really liked Meryl from MGS4 and want to create characters like her in games. I'm not into making gameplay.

I hope our answers were helpful.
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Quote:
Original post by GCX-15
Well can I use filmmaking for game cut scenes in the games industry or don't I need it?

If you want to study filmmaking, then you should!
If you are a computer nerd and you want to study programming, then go for it.
Take classes in both if you want. You can always take classes in whatever other topic you want to.
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Sounds like you just want to make CGI movies and not have anything to do with games. I could be wrong but I think most companies farm out the rendered cut scenes to outside animation studios. And then they are made to a prearranged storyboard and script so there would probably be very little original thinking in them.
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It sounds to me like you are much more interested in film making. Personally,I would study film, and then try and find someone else to program for you/your team.

In retrospect, that is the way I wish I had have done it. I spent many years learning to program well, and worked hard on my computer studies, graduating top of my class. But I very much wish I had have studied film instead.

I always wanted to make very cinematic games, but when it came to actually knuckling down and doing the work, I would tire of the programming quickly. I found that I would be far more interested in writing story ideas and developing scenarios. As a result, I began to program less, and less, and less. In fact, I've hardly written any code in the last 18 months or more.

How about getting involved in some machinima, and modding/scripting and see how you get on with that? Not everyone can program, and embarking on such a course simply may not be your kind of thing. At least doing some modding work may give you an idea of what it entails.
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Quote:
Original post by DanKennard
It sounds to me like you are much more interested in film making. Personally,I would study film, and then try and find someone else to program for you/your team.

In retrospect, that is the way I wish I had have done it. I spent many years learning to program well, and worked hard on my computer studies, graduating top of my class. But I very much wish I had have studied film instead.

I always wanted to make very cinematic games, but when it came to actually knuckling down and doing the work, I would tire of the programming quickly. I found that I would be far more interested in writing story ideas and developing scenarios. As a result, I began to program less, and less, and less. In fact, I've hardly written any code in the last 18 months or more.

How about getting involved in some machinima, and modding/scripting and see how you get on with that? Not everyone can program, and embarking on such a course simply may not be your kind of thing. At least doing some modding work may give you an idea of what it entails.

Yes good idea. I find it incredulous that there are way too many people that blindly start studying for a 4 years for a degree in something they have never seen anyone do any daily work in so they have no idea whether they will be able to do it day after day for several years or more.
Reminds me of an interview I just read on the famous pornstar Tera Patrick. I had heard that she had a nursing degree or something and she confirmed it in an interview and they asked her why she didn't stick with that since it's a pretty good paying job and she did go to school 4 years for it and she basically said that when she actually started working in it after college she found it boring!
It's like WTF?
"2NR: It's pretty much known that you went to nursing school, but what made you move away from nursing?

TP: Um, money. I was a model when I was a teenager so I knew what it was like to be in front of the camera. Then I got the job and got bored. I didn't think that I was going to be a pornstar and make a lot of money. I wanted something different in my life I just wanted to be back in entertainment.
"
I tend to think it's not always that black and white though and that a lot of people are actually pressured by family or friends to pursue what they think they should and not what the person really wants.


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