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ahmedkl

Game like Worms

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Hello people I am new here :D , I wanted to know that which game engine can I use or which language can be used to make a game like worms? or if someone has played dinky bomb , both are quite the same , I am very good at C++ and can make almost all the data structures so coding wont be difficult for me , i have been looking in which language or engine to make the game , so can anyone help me out :) ?

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Why not using C++ then? If you are very good at it.
You need to use openGL or directx for the graphics.

These are just enough to code a worms like program.

I coded a tank_wars/scorch clone a few years ago with Borland C 2.0 to Dos.
All I needed was a BGI, and some time.

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yup but it should be some sort of professional looking game , and is it difficult or easy to make in OpenGL cause what i have heard is that you have to write code for every single thing?and what if i want to make an RPG game or somewhat like armymen , should i use some game engine or OpenGL ?

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Coding every single thing means drawing lines (defined by 2 points) drawing triangles (defined by 3 points), changing colors etc, which you have to do with an engine too.

And you were talking about worms, not an RPG. Or maybe I only know the old worms versions :P

You can use game engines for RPGs of course, but since I didn't use any of them, someone else should recommend you one.

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It depends on your skill/motivation... If you want to develop in High or Low level...
In any case it's possible and not insurmountable to make a game like worms, in Low level, with Directx/OpenGL but,if you have knowledge in C++ but not in the game development, you will have to work during 1 year to make a full game like worms (very very approximately).
So if you are pressed, choose the Hight level, but I'm not an expert of that... I prefer low level :D

good luck !

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I should start from low level cause starting straight with high level will be kinda messy , so then I should choose OpenGL?and any guides to install that thingy , i normally use Visual C++ 6.0

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A game like worms isn't too terribly hard to make. Normally I'd suggest using something other than C++, but if you already know some of the language, that's a different story.

As far as libraries go, there's a ton. SDL, Allegro, SFML, ClanLib, et. al.

If you want to avoid C++ (which some people might still recommend you do), I'd suggest either C# w/ XNA or Python w/ Pygame

OpenGL is very difficult to work with, and I really wouldn't recommend starting out with it. If you're dead set on it though, I'm afraid I can't help you with tutorials. I know a few, but most OpenGL tutorials are notorious for encouraging bad code, and I can't in good conscience recommend one of them.

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I still haven't decided which one to choose , i am also searching for different game engines , i just want to start least i want to make a single game and then i want to try more , so people give your opinions as much as you can :)

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a couple of things,

i would recommend the express edition of Microsoft visual studio 2008, it seems more stable to me then the visual c++ 6.0 and there are less issues with libraries, and it's free.

next use something like sfml or sdl, they both provide access to opengl and both have tutorials on setting them up and using them with opengl. both also can help you handle input from the keyboard, mouse and joystick

SDL libsdl.org
SFML sfml-dev.org

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thanks Fritz , other then then what's the basic difference b.w making a game on OpenGL and a game engine? and probably i will be making a 2d game , i did download a game engine i.e unity3d but i think it's just for 3d games as far as i can guess , which is the best engine for developing a 2d game?

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there isn't much difference the game engine is just a layer of abstraction on top of opengl or directx. engines help keep you away from the nitty gritty stuff. to some that is the bonus and best parts of an engine and to others that is the worst part of an engine.

in theory if you are using an engine it lets you focus only on the actual logic and mechanics of your game. but on the downside of using an engine you are required to use what the authors of the engine thought was the best approach to how something should be done. in some cases this can prevent you from doing what you want to do with your games

if you are making a game on top of opengl you would create the abstractions your self letting you decide how things should be done. and its easier to change how things are done in your game. but it is also can be alot harder because you have to think about how things relate to each other.

i haven't come a cross to many 2d game engines

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The best 2d game engine (with some 3d capabilities) I came across (and used) was GameMaker. Sure, now half the gamedev.net community will flame me for this comment (:P), but I personally belive GM is the optimal tool for a beginner to get into Game development.
Linky

It has it's own scripting language when you want to move onto more 'hard-core' stuff. The rest of the coding interface is drag&drop. It's really easy to work with, has a fast workflow, and ultimatly is enough for most 2d games (including worms).



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You say you've got some experience with C++, so I would recommend C# and XNA. I don't know if you've used C# yet, but if your coming from a C++ background it's very easy to pick up, no need to be worrying about manual memory management, the MSVS C# IDE is probably the best IDE I've ever used and the .NET framework has an answer for pretty much everything. Add XNA to the mix and you'll be throwing together games in no time. The only thing easier would be if Microsoft implemented an IDE which could read my thoughts via electrodes attached to my head and code the game for me. (maybe soon eh?)

Bleh, I just re-read that, and I sound like a raving Microsoft fan boy. I don't care - good language, good IDE. :)

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thanks DaveMS i will try XNA now but can you also please give a tutorial to setup OpenGL with C++ :) cause i want to work in C++ too :D , I also can code in C# but not as good as C++ so wont be a problem

Thanks

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Hi,

I have to agree you should do C# + Xna. If you want to do C++, I'd say, learn DirectX, unless you are a Linux fan. It is a little bit harder, but OpenGL has some severe disadvantages:

- Windows does not offer support to OpenGL after version 1.1 (I think, something around that). If you want to use these features, you'll have to use OpenGL extensions, which are not that friendly.

- You cannot load your textures in OpenGL. You'll have to go for some library for it.

- You cannot write text to the screen in OpenGL. You'll have to go for some library for it.

- You cannot handle events in OpenGL. You'll have to go for some another library for it. Someone will tell you to use Glut, but that won't take you very far. SDL is probably a better shot, but texture loading and text writing are painful.

- Someday, you will get to the point where you are the only person in the world using your combination of loading library + shader language + writing text library.. And then you're just alone with your bug, no one can help you.

- In the end, if you ever get to work at a big game company, you'll probably need DirectX.

In my opinion, you should *definetely* do C# + Xna, at least for a first game. If you program C++ for 20 years and started C# yesterday, this will still be easier.

Good Luck!

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thanks a bunch Rosalia , I am going to start C#+XNA then as you mentioned , so is this the version of XNA to be downloaded?
http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=80782277-D584-42D2-8024-893FCD9D3E82&displaylang=en

I already have visual C# 2008 installed

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Quote:
Original post by ahmedkl
yup but it should be some sort of professional looking game


I would just like to point something out that nobody else seems to have mentioned. A "professional look game" is allll about the art. You can code it in assembly using notepad, or in Visual Studio with C# and XNA ... either way without nice art it will still look amateur. So all the suggestions here are decent, but don't worry too much about it - a different language will not make your game LOOK professional, it will simply make the process simpler or more complex.

Every single project at work I do looks like something I did in the basement of my parents house till the artists come along. A week of moving things up/down a pixel and replacing my programmer art with their colour coordinated pictures and BHAM its a real game no matter how horrible the code is.

(As for opengl C++ tutorials SDL is an easy winner: SDL tutorial pages.)

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It will always depend on the game, but it is a great way to start. The final look may not depend on the language, but if it takes a month with Xna, it will take 5-6 months in OpenGL + C++.

If I were you, I'd just do it. Don't lose too much time looking for *the best* language of the world, everyone here will have a different piece of advice. This is something you'll find by yourself.

Xna may not be the best thing around, but it is easy, there are LOTS of examples you can copy from and you can code to you XboX 360.

Good Luck!

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Quote:
Original post by Rosalia
- Windows does not offer support to OpenGL after version 1.1 (I think, something around that). If you want to use these features, you'll have to use OpenGL extensions, which are not that friendly.
You can use glew
Quote:

- You cannot load your textures in OpenGL. You'll have to go for some library for it.
There are a lot of libraries, or you could even write your own tga/bmp loading functions (there are tons of tutorials on the net, ctr+c/ctr+v)
Quote:

- You cannot write text to the screen in OpenGL. You'll have to go for some library for it.
You can (wgl.h comes with any compilers/IDEs), it's a bit tricky to setup, but look at NEHE tutorials (related to gamedev.net) (ctr+c/ctr+v)

The other statements are/may be true, but I don't think it's too hard to setup these things, if you use glut for the beginning, you can easily switch to win32 later (there are tons of tutorials on the net, ctr+c/ctr+v).

But that's just an opinion, it's easier to go with existing engines, it depends on what means fun to you. For example I enjoy doing everything myself, because I can learn essence of the whole thing, so in the end, I will be able to do anything (writing a program that shoots us to Alpha Centauri [grin])

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