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sitwind

2d stealth game level design

11 posts in this topic

hi, I am working on a 2d stealth game, in which the player plays a thief. So far I mostly worked on the level editor, and it is going quite well. Ihere are some usual elements like elec. sealed doors, laser traps, cameras... and some unusual traps too. Now I am starting to think about the level design. Any one know if there is some level design resources for this kind of game? I think the difficulty is related to reflex and puzzle (maybe some time limit)? It should be relatively easy to get the less valuable loot. but if the player wants the "+50 strength/intelligence/dexterity dragon slayer", it should be really difficult. I have some related info about this subject, like general level design, puzzle books and interestingly some lockpicking book... But would still appreciate some advices from you guys! :) here is a screenshot, left side editor, right side game
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Are you willing to release the game in an unfinished form to players? One of the best ways to find out what kind of innovation is possible within your game is to let a bunch of people try it. Just like players find glitches and exploits in games mere hours after its released, they can do some truly amazing things with level design. All those novelty Mario levels and Unreal Tournament maps contain gems of insight that you might never have come up with on your own. Sure, you'll get fifty dick maps and ten maps designed to break the game for every worthwhile nugget, but with the added insight, you can make "official" maps of a very high quality.
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The game will be released as a free game, so technically this should not be a issue. But I think what you really mean is the level editor itself? One way or another I still need to design the levels myself, else it becomes like a blue sky research, with no guarantee if anyone will be interested or if any useful design will turn up. It is certainly an idea to release the level I come up with and see what people think about it. If there is interest I will think about the level editor release.

But anyway, I still need to design the level myself at the beginning, so back to my original question :)

[Edited by - sitwind on December 25, 2009 5:37:15 PM]
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Have you played the original Metal Gear series at all? Metal Gear wasn't that great, but "Metal Gear 2: Solid Snake" for the MSX was really a rather neat game, with a surprisingly large number of elements from the modern Metal Gear Solid series. If you don't have access to an MSX (who does?) or Subsistence version of "Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater" (it includes both of MG1 and MG2), the GameBoy Color "Metal Gear Solid" game is pretty much a direct clone with an updated story. The GBC version is probably the best version, as it also includes training missions and trial games with some really clever uses of game elements to create more of a puzzle-like gameplay.
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Yes, i played MGS 1 and 2. Though the idea of the game does not originate from them, I found it is an easy way to describe the game style by referencing to them. And the color scheme is taken from MGS.

I did replay MGS 1 to get some inspiration, but it is most action/tactical oriented, I try to encourage the player to do more strategic planning if it is achievable.
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Ohhh, the GBC version is a great tip, and it is 2d too! I will see if i could
try it somewhere.

Did not pick it up at first glance, because i did not know what GBC is. :) Take me a few minutes to realize.

thanx!
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You don't need to have a ton of levels before you release it as a beta. Just enough to demonstrate the potential of the tools, and get the players thinking.
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Quote:
Original post by sitwind
Ohhh, the GBC version is a great tip, and it is 2d too! I will see if i could
try it somewhere.

Did not pick it up at first glance, because i did not know what GBC is. :) Take me a few minutes to realize.

thanx!

Right, and I was originally referring to Metal Gear and Metal Gear 2: Solid Snake, which are both 2D games that predate Metal Gear Solid by more than 8 years. Metal Gear 2 is the game that basically got cloned to the GameBoy Color for the GBC version of Metal Gear Solid (aka Metal Gear: Ghost Babel). You might be able to find Ghost Babel in a used game store. It will be nearly impossible to find an original copy of Metal Gear and Metal Gear 2. However, Metal Gear Solid 3: Subsistence includes ports of both for the PS2.

Also, if you have a PSP, you might want to check out Metal Gear Acid 2. The first game has a better storyline (still shit though) and more realistic graphics, but the second game has a better game system. Seeing as how bad the storyline was for both games and how the game doesn't really relate one to the other, you'll be fine checking out the second game without having played the first game. They feature a card-based, turn-based gameplay system that operates in essentially a 2D playing field (just with 3D graphics). It was a really unique system that was not anywhere near as preposterous as it sounds once you got into it.
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The demo level's layout is finished and i am implementing some
additional traps right now. It will be finished soon and i will
upload it so you guys could give me some feedback.
Looking forward to it :)
here a screenshot of the level layout



[Edited by - sitwind on January 5, 2010 7:43:34 AM]
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That black back-ground makes it hard to look at. Even if that's how it looks in the game, when I'm designing the level I would want that to be a preview mode, and to be able to design the level with a clearer design, like black walls on white background, or something that makes the walls and features stand out better.
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