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Orymus

Breaking into Game Design

33 posts in this topic

Quote:
Original post by Tom Sloper
Quote:
Original post by Dragonsdale
what if you're not the coding kind but the storywriting and artsy kind? How do you get your foot in the door?

If you "View Forum FAQ" (see link above), you will find answers to this sort of Frequently Asked Question (get it? Frequently Asked Question... FAQ...)


right, sorry. feel like such a noob now
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Quote:
Original post by Obscure
Because they are not as dumb as you seem to think - they realised that a degree is useful for their career ...

You could be right about some students, but a lot of them are just studying because they don't know what else to do and don't want to work yet. Even in university/master's. At least that's how it is where I come from. History is a popular choice for those students.
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Original post by Schildpad
1. a lot of them are just studying because they don't know what else to do
2. and don't want to work yet.
3. History is a popular choice for those students.

1. A lot of us were like that in college, myself included.
2. That was me too, I guess.
3. History is an important subject for game designers.
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"what if you're not the coding kind but the storywriting and artsy kind? How do you get your foot in the door?"

Art people turn up with portfolios.

OK, recruiting works like this.. if you want to get hired into job X, you have to convince the person signing the cheques for job X that you have two attributes. You don't have to convince people on this board or strangers in the street, just the person with the money. Or someone else, who will convince the person with the money for you -- like a hiring manager for instance.

The two things hiring managers want to know are;

1) Can this person do the job?

2) Do I want this person doing the job?

So here's how you get hired;

1) Be very convincing that you can do the job -- that gets you into the interview. Qualifications, portfolio, track record, kick ass CV are all part of this. That sort of thing. Your CV is a *SALES TOOL*. It's not merely a list of jobs/universities you were at for a while.

2) Be personable -- someone that other people won't actively not want to be around during one of those stressy ten or twelve hour days. It's amazing how many people don't smile during a job interview. I tend to conclude that if they don't smile once during a couple of hours they probably never will...

There's only two other ways to get a job I can think of. One is to be recommended by someone the money person already trusts -- if you can set this up, you pass #1 by recommendation and you merely have to meet #2.

The other is by nepotism, bribery or other mechanism like that. The advantage of this route is that you don't need to meet either of the requirements, but there may be a lot of "up front" arranging to do... :-)
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One good way I've personally found to convince that I can do the job is to actually do it.

Say you apply for a said job, ummm, name whichever you'd like.
The whole point of the interview will be about what you'd do if you had the job, because they don't want just someone who is qualified but also someone who has an idea of how this will work out.
If you think you're ready to apply for a job, actually stop and do the job. I personally recall asking for a job in QA with an actual test plan in hand for an hypothetical project that they were working on. I had layed out everything, even statistics about the potential customer targets.
The line from the interviewer that probably got me the job was simply "I see you came well prepared"
That's the kind of line you want to hear in the interview, as it will make you and the interviewer much more compatible. More often than not, the interview will go deeper into the details of the actual job, and they will comment on your plan, etc... Usually, when this happens, if you did things the right way, you already have the job. You and the interviewer just don't know it yet ;)
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What would be required for an undergraduate graphic designer to go into the field of game design?

I am finishing up my undergrad in graphic design and I am interested in learning more about game design. Possibly a Masters Degree. What should be the first step in the exploration process?

I know one of the requirements ultimately is drawing. Does anyone know of a great self taught book to improve skills?



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The first step in the exploration process would be to View Forum FAQ (above).
Then read these:
http://www.sloperama.com/advice/lesson41.htm
http://www.igda.org/games-game-april-2006
Drawing is not a requirement for game designers. I'm surprised that as a graphic design major you'd be expressing concern about that.
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[quote name='Schildpad' timestamp='1264607314' post='4594733']
You could be right about some students, but a lot of them are just studying because they don't know what else to do and don't want to work yet. Even in university/master's. At least that's how it is where I come from. History is a popular choice for those students.
[/quote]
In which case continuing their education would be a really smart thing to do. It keeps them off the streets for a few years and exposes them to a host of information and experiences they would not otherwise have. During that time they may discover something they are passionate about and may mature enough to make difficult life choices. Dropping out of school because you don't know what you want to do would definitely be the dumb option.
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I was surprised to see this post is now being pinned as reference.
In all regards, I'll give an overdue update on my status.
I have now achieved over 6 months as a Project Coordinator.
I am still working on my side project which should hit online distribution platforms in Q1 2013.
If I'm lucky enough, I should be able to land in a job in Game Design after that.
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