• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Ozymandias117

Need some tips on getting into the field

3 posts in this topic

Hi, I am interested in getting into video game programming. So far, all I've done are several text based games in c++ (Mainly a text based RPG with 10 levels). I plan on going to a college for Computer Science. I was hoping people could give me some advice on what I need to start learning to program games with graphics (2D and 3D) as well as good colleges for programming.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
For programming questions, read the FAQ for the For Beginners forum.
For graphics questions, try the Visual Arts forum.
As for schools, read these for starters:
http://www.sloperama.com/advice/lesson44.htm
http://www.sloperama.com/advice/lesson25.htm
Make an appointment to spend time with your high school career counselor. S/he is there to help you with this very question, in person.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If I may, I find it that people around here get hired for their versatility whenever possible.
The truth is the first or couple first projects you'd be assigned to in the industry would possibly not "thrill" you. So text-based games are good, a handful of small projects if possible. Then again, a couple larger ones may help, that display a clear understanding of 2d and 3d logics. The graphics themselves can be crappy, or free, or even outsourced from an artist that, just like you, is attempting to dig in the field.

My personal HR stated that in order to be hired where I work, you'd need to answer this question positively: Could you spend the next year programming a game for female teens with a lot of pink and ribbon? And not just as in a "state of mind" but also as an efficient part of the team, someone who can claim has already experience as an indie programmer working with the assets used in that game.

Also, c++ is great, but it is not all. A lot of entry-level positions I've seen for programmers are flash or based of different languages because they serve different needs on different platforms. Just because C++ is the "king of hardcore dev" doesn't mean it is the only one you need to master. (Oh and by the way, I do not mean what I said between the quotes, though many people seem to so...)

Hopefully that helps a little?
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='Ozymandias117' timestamp='1262970071' post='558519']
Hi, I am interested in getting into video game programming. So far, all I've done are several text based games in c++ (Mainly a text based RPG with 10 levels). I plan on going to a college for Computer Science. I was hoping people could give me some advice on what I need to start learning to program games with graphics (2D and 3D) as well as good colleges for programming.
[/quote]

Spend a good time investigating the Schools / Colleges you have access to. Check that their curricula is for an area that interest you, example: Some carriers go towards businnes and management and others may lean for more technical subjects even if they both are called Computer Science. There are also more technical schools that specifically deal with video games, simulation and similar subjects. Still, in my opinion to make great games, get a good job or to make your own studio later what's more important is what [b]you [/b]do, not what a school taught you.

To make it short:
[list=1][*]Study whatever you find interesting and you think could be useful, but more important what you think will be more fun for you.[*]Try to do some student work, professional service or whatever it's called there as early as possible, no matter if it's not video game related.[*]Continue doing personal projects every once in a while even if they will not be useful for school, and if you can tie them to school projects that's great![*]If you get the time and the chance join with a team online or in the real world to [i]successfully [/i]create a game or a mod.[*]Always keep a record and proof of every noticeable project you do in or out of school.[/list]
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0