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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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Crimzn

Getting Into Production Positions - Master's in Game Design Viable?

4 posts in this topic

I am basically asking for either a review or advice regarding the attendance of the Master's in Game Design program at Full Sail and it's potential for hirability. Sloper, I have read your entire site but I still have to ask this and hope you'll reply :) I recently graduated from a local university with a Bachelors of Science in Communications. I have not been able to get a job relating to my field but am currently working as an office manager of a small electrical company. I am extremely passionate about games and feel that working in that industry is the only way I'll achieve long term happiness. However, I am not very artistically inclined or compelled by programming; though, my degree provided me with graphic design experience. My degree also provided me with film production, television production, PR, acting, creative writing, scriptwriting, and directorial experience. Upon viewing gaming job options, I felt that production would be the best field for me. The question of how best to enter this field still remains. The Full Sail Master of Game Design is focused on the production element of the industry and lists that it prepares you for a career as: Assistant Producer Associate Producer Development Director Development Manager Junior Designer Localization Producer Producer Project Lead Project Manager QA Lead Studio Director So would this degree really give me hirability for what I'm wanting or would it be a huge waste of money without other game industry skills and experience. Do entry level positions for production and management even exist? Thanks for your time Sincerely, Anthony
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The problem is that most, if not all, of these positions are positions that are usually hired internally or if not, they're looking for people with years of production experience. You don't generally get into these positions without having done something else first, and you've already dismissed two of the most obvious ways in: art and programming.

So with those two aside, your next best bets are level design and QA, neither of which are going to come any easier for this program. Getting a job in QA is mostly about luck and trying hard for a long time, and level design is an area where a lot of "outsiders" are picked up for their demonstrable skills. Having this course on your CV for these jobs you might make you look enthusiastic, but it's a lot of money and hard work to make you look enthusiastic, n'est ce pas?

So I'd say your best bet is to knock on doors until you can get a foot in the door in QA - but be prepared for a salary nosedive, or if you fancy level design (which is something quite different from graphic design) then work on a mod. An awful lot of people got hired as level designers from working on mods.
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Anthony wrote, after presumptuously calling me by my last name as if we were old Frat buddies or something,

>I recently graduated from a local university with a Bachelors of Science in Communications.
>my degree provided me with graphic design experience. My degree also provided me with film production, television production, PR, acting, creative writing, scriptwriting, and directorial experience.

That's not "experience." Read http://www.igda.org/games-game-october-2006

>I ... am currently working as an office manager of a small electrical company.

Good. That's "experience." Read http://sloperama.com/advice/lesson41.htm

>I felt that production would be the best field for me. The question of how best to enter this field still remains.

Yes. What's your breaking-in plan?

>would this degree really give me hirability for what I'm wanting

Can't know that without knowing what your breaking-in plan is.

>...without other game industry skills and experience. Do entry level positions for production and management even exist?

I thought you said you'd read all my FAQs? http://sloperama.com/advice/lesson42.htm
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Haha, my bad, I thought I had read it all. Guess I missed that page. Thanks for the reply in any case.

So I guess I should put Full Sail on hold and start trying to break my way in through QA and Communications positions. I have already sent my resume in for both at Blizzard without response.

I'd like to develop more skills that would allow me to apply to entry level positions. Maybe level design? Could you recommend a program to me for creating portfolio worthy levels?
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Quote:
Original post by Crimzn
Maybe level design? Could you recommend a program to me for creating portfolio worthy levels?

Why don't you ask that in the Game Design forum. And maybe these would also be useful:
http://www.sloperama.com/advice/m69.htm
http://www.sloperama.com/advice/lesson56.htm
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