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Meqar

school choices

11 posts in this topic

I'm going to guess that someone probably already asked about this but I'll ask again cause I can't find the thread. How do independent schools like Art Institute, Ringling and Collins compare to going to a true university. Say that I got a degree from an independent school and actually did put in the effort to have a good skill-set ready, how would that compare in the real world for me when a company takes a look? Also, are any of these independent schools offering degrees particularly better than others that anyone knows about?
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You'll end up getting the usual "Go to a 4 year University for a computer science degree and make games on the side".

Practical life experience however shows that this doesn't necessarily land jobs. What WILL help though is whichever school you choose, make the most of it, go the extra mile and learn not only in the classroom but on your own. Any college, no matter what will only get you so far. Its up to you to study, learn whatever you can on the side and work on creating a good portfolio by the time graduation goes around.

That being said I did a local tech school for 1 year, a 4 year uni (Penn State) for two years then switched to DeVry and went with their online option. I learn better on my own and have learned much more from an online school then I did at a standard college. Your milage may vary.
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If you're serious about game development and have the opportunity for school...might aswell go to a school for gaming. :p

It's best because they will specifically cater to what you need to learn...and there is alot of that. ;)
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I do have to agree with the gaming school idea. I have friends who have computer science degrees and three friends who graduated from digipen.

Only the digipen friends have jobs in the game industry.
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Hmmm..interesting thread...more or less i'm in the same situation..interested in graphics from my school life..landed up in a 4yr comp sci bachelors degree(india)..then again(now) in a 2yr masters in comp sci program(germany)..but in my masters, i'm taking graphics as my specialization, any suggestions for me guys??
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I think you should mention in what direction you would like to go. There is a big difference between for example modelling and programming. I am not familiar with the mentioned schools, so excuse me if your choice is clear if one is familiar with the schools.

A CS degree is typically something that would get you into programming (if you build up a specific game related portfolio in your free time). I think when it comes to the artistic side that a degree is not as important as a solid portfolio.
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hmm..so u say i'm on a right path if'm willing to get into the programming aspect of game development?
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If you do end up choosing a game school, please, please, please... At least choose one of the reputable ones.

Specialized University tracts are great (eg: The guildhall at SMU)
Digipen is probably the best, and most rounded, of non-university, non-traditional programs.
Fullsail has a decent reputation, but their course-catalog is lacking (not enough required math to graduate, and too much focus on APIs, for instance) and they tend to turn out grads that are more grunts than innovators and leaders -- though there are always exceptions.

Devry, ITT, Collins, etc... Don't fall for an "as-seen-on-TV" education. Do you really want to go to a school who markets themselves with ads during Jerry Springer? Or one who's marketting budget exceeds what they put into *improving* their program?
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Well, in the past I have worked with 3d studio max some but dropped it and picked up programming as a new hoby. Right now I'm planning to go right back into 3d designs and animation because I enjoyed it a lot and see if I can fit in some spare time to learning about gaming engines and OpenGL/DirectX. I have done some college courses but not past my associates yet but if I can find me a school that is reputable and will teach me everything I need to know I would probably rather do that.
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Quote:
Original post by Meqar
if I can find me a school that is reputable and will teach me everything I need to know I would probably rather do that.

OK, well, after you read the FAQs (above) let us know if we can help.
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