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Khoals

Starting C++...

11 posts in this topic

I''ve been learning to program in Visual Basic for a few months now and with it received a good grasp on programming in general, but once I completely feel confident with VB, I know I''ll want to move onto a better programming language in terms of performance. I''ve had C++ in mind. My question comes down to this: Which compiler or software suite will best help me learn and put to use C++. I know that Visual Basic does a lot of work for you with controls and whatever else, so I''m really looking for a good way to learn C++ as a whole. I guess I''m somewhat afraid that Visual C++ might cut out certain areas that I might find essential to learn. In the end, I''m really doing this all to be a little extra prepared for when I go to college in a few years. Any insight on the best route to fully learn C++ for a busy Highschooler would be appreciated, including the software I should use/purchase, and any recommended books. Thanks in advance.
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Well, I my self have learned Visual C++ and continuning to learn more, with the help of online collage courses that do not have an age limit!! i am 14 =)....Visual C++ doesn''t cut anything out that i have learned or know about, i learned the foundaments or C++ then Visual C++ adds on to that.. I also believe that the best compiler that i have tried is Microsoft Visual C++ 6.0 because it has a relitivly easy interface and lots of usful tools. I would suggest gettin Ivor Hortons "beggining Visual C++ 6 compiler edition" the book itself costs aroun $100.00 canadian but it comes with a free indroductory edition compiler (Microsoft Visual c++ 6.0). This is currently what i am using becuase the full version costs a lot of money. So...I could help you in your learnings if you want to learn Visual C++ 6.0

If you chose a different language, I wish you the best of luck...

Sincerly,

Mitchell
William
Mulholland
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Well, I my self have learned Visual C++ and continuning to learn more, with the help of online collage courses that do not have an age limit!! i am 14 =)....Visual C++ doesn''t cut anything out that i have learned or know about, i learned the foundaments or C++ then Visual C++ adds on to that.. I also believe that the best compiler that i have tried is Microsoft Visual C++ 6.0 because it has a relitivly easy interface and lots of usful tools. I would suggest gettin Ivor Hortons "beggining Visual C++ 6 compiler edition" the book itself costs aroun $100.00 canadian but it comes with a free indroductory edition compiler (Microsoft Visual c++ 6.0). This is currently what i am using becuase the full version costs a lot of money. So...I could help you in your learnings if you want to learn Visual C++ 6.0,
My e-mail addy is: mitch13m@hotmail.com
my ICQ # is: 120994078

If you chose a different language, I wish you the best of luck...

Sincerly,

Mitchell
William
Mulholland
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srry bout the 2 posts, i pressed stop because forgot to attach my e-mail and icq....sorry again

-----------------------------
-------Mitch Mulholland------
----A.K.A.= TwisteR----------
-----------------------------
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Hey if you guys want the full edition I suggest you find a college Programming major, cause down here in Texas they all get the full MS Developer suite with Visual Java, Visual C++, basically the whole $600 kaboom for $50. I got a burned copy from a guy, and it''s pretty good, but I perfer code Warrior for C++ it''s very simple to use and powerful for non Graphics programs. MS Developer Studio has too complicated and interface for some one just wanting to do tests and stuff, but good (REALLY GOOD) if you can just figure out what it all does, but with no manual I am kinda stuck.

Oh well
Me.
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Visual C++ will always be my favorite compiler. And don''t worry, Visual C++ doesn''t "cut out" anything. Programming is programming, you have to do everything in VC++ just like any other compiler. Only VC++, IMHO, has a very nice and easy to use interface. Tons of features, comes with a bunch of very useful tools and stuff. It has a whole bunch of features in its IDE that make it very easy to use.
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personally, i have gotten most of my more expensive software (visual studio professional, windows upgrades, office 2000, etc.) from my college. our library lets you check out software and install one copy on your machine. i know not everyone has access to this method. that and you actually end up spending more on the classes to get the library card anyways. but if you are already going to school like i am, it works out pretty well. that or for you younger programmers, ask your older friends or siblings who go to the local university to see if they have these options and check out the software for you. its save me hundreds of dollars and counting.

cyn
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Err, yeah. Definitely get that Ivor Horton book. I learned C++ from that. Very easy.
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Ahh, thanks all. I''ll be sure to look into it all. I guess I was worried that Visual C++ was somehow an easier, stripped down version of a C++ compiler, but since I''m familiar with Visual Basic, I hope it''ll make an easy transition.
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I pesonally like Borland C++ Builder. It''s alot like Visual Basic except that it uses C++. Duh. Anyway, if you are a student and are looking for some really good prices on software, try JourneyEd.com. They sell products to students at discounted prices (I got Borland Builder 5 Profesional for 99.95, regular price 799.00 Cha-Ching!). They sell lots of diffrent software, so you might want to check it out.
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Whoops, one thing I forgot to ask about Visual C++ was what edition I should get. I''ve been stuck with the Visual Basic Learning Edition for a while and am somewhat disappointed with how much it doesn''t have compared to the professional edition. So is Standard Visual C++ the C++ equivalent to the VB Learning edition, or would Professional Visual C++ suit my needs? One last rant, would any other software titles such as Borland C++ Builder mentioned earlier or another have these different "editions" that I should look out for.

Whew, thanks for putting up with all my questions.
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Everyone likes VC++. But from what I see people say, they like the IDE & imply they like the compiler. Personally I LOVE the IDE & it''s a pleasure to use it at work every day. The compiler is another matter. It has a tonne of MS "extensions" that make it far from ANSI compilant (does anyone else notice a non-compilance trend in M$ business tactics?) And if you turn the extensions off you basically can''t program in Win32API without tooth pulling pain. As some examples, the compiler has a little trouble with templates, doesn''t allow consts inside classes and isn''t compilant when declaring variables in a for loop statement (ie for(int i....)) I prefer gcc as a compiler, but MSVC++ as an IDE.

Just thoughts
Brad
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