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dbgamer

Help with Resume? I'M INSECURE...

5 posts in this topic

Hello everyone! So, I am attempting a video game internship in about 3 hours, and I'm going to submit my resume. Keep in mind that I have no industry experience outside of my own projects. I am looking for the harshest comments around, so long as it's constructive. So, I would be very appreciative of anyone who would help. (please) http://www.mynameismatt.net/RESUME.doc OR http://www.mynameismatt.net/RESUME.pdf
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Looks about like mine, for what its worth.

Suggest you detail exactly which technologies you used in each project, as well as what role you fulfilled if they were team projects, add coursework projects if it helps you backup your listed technologies. Anyone can list a string of technologies they know - important to provide something to back it up.
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Okay. Yeah, I agree with that, and will make changes accordingly. Thank you very much, sir!
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"Potential Junior Programmer in Games" - Get rid of this. It doesn't tell us anything about you at all. "potential" hints that you aren't in the industry, and thus gives people incentive to quit reading right there. Games in blue looks cheesy. You're going to be applying for game jobs, so they don't need to see "oh games right"


"To be hired for an internship at an amazing company, work with great people, solve unique problems, and learn from some of the best in the industry." This is a terrible objective statement simply because it describes every company on the planet. Every company is going to consider themselves amazing. Every company is going to hire great people. Every company has its own unique problems.

More importantly, your objective is focused on you. No one cares what you want out of an internship. You should be phrasing your objective statement to focus on what they want. Start with something like "An internship that utilizes my programming knowledge and computer skills while exposing me to the computer game industry." Notice that it highlights what a company wants first - you want my programming knowledge and my computer skills.

"Languages: C++, DirectX 10, C#, XNA, HLSL" - XNA isn't a language, it's a library. Also, is this it? You don't know any web languages? You don't know C or Java? You don't know OpenGL? Programmers in the games industry are typically expected to know a lot. It seems like the only thing you really know that's worth something is C++. Internships are extremely competitive, and so people like me (and tons of others) are majoring in Computer Science. Here's my "Programming Skills" section: Programming Skills: Experience with Lua, Maya, Java, C++, OpenGL, javascript, XML, XSLT, PHP, HTML, Visual Basic, Microsoft Word, Excel, Powerpoint, Scheme, MySQL, C#, and Cocoa/Objective C.

"Work closely with 7 programmers on business and network applications for clients as well as in-house staff and administration." - This doesn't tell me anything about what you're doing and more just describes who you're doing it with. Also, this is a very bad sentence grammatically. Resumes do generally push the line on what is and isn't grammatically correct, but this sentence really doesn't flow well.

" Worked with local and remote team of Web Application Programmers  Programmed custom filters for financial reports" How did you program web applications without any web programming knowledge? Again, the first thing doesn't tell me anything about what you did, just who you did it with. What were your responsibilities?

Inclue hours-per-week and languages used in both of the work experience sections.

"Projects: 3D Pong Room – 3d version of the classic game, “Pong”, built using DirectX10. Tetricube – Classic game, “Tetris”, built using XNA."

Uh, what? That's all you're going to bother to say here? Tell us where to look for these. Otherwise, it's just wasted space.

Education: Bachelor of Science in Computer Science, August 2004 - December 2010 Arkansas State University – Jonesboro, AR

Hate to hit hard here because I'm sure there's a good story behind it, but 6 years? It took you 6 years to graduate? Don't include the start date. Include your graduation date and GPA. (GPA needs to be on there).

Goodluck.
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Alright!

That's more like what I was asking for.
I've updated the resumes, and I think it has a lot more useful information.

Closer to what MAEnthoven has suggested.

I worry that many of the languages have little relevance, but I did put the languages that I have worked with.

I also removed the tagline, updated the objective, added project references (note, the website mentioned isn't finished)

I updated other minor details suggested below.

Any other comments would be greatly appreciated.

And again, MAEnthoven, thank you.

-Matt
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"An internship that will put my programming skills to use, allowing me to grow with the company so that I may become a useful asset." - Still off. "may become a useful asset" will totally turn off any company who considers you. You should BE a useful asset BEFORE joining, not "becoming" one. You shouldn't be talking about "the company" at all in any objective statement. Your previous iteration had this error also. Your objective should be about what you want to do in a larger sense. Saying "allowing me to grow with the company" simply sounds weird.

"Implemented Technologies include: artificial intelligence, normal mapping, and basic lighting." Decrease "technologies," get rid of the colon. Should be "Implemented technologies include artificial intelligence, normal mapping, and basic lighting.

"Worked solo for 2 weeks, and will continue to provide updates." No one cares how long you worked, or that you're going to provide updates. Saying "2 weeks" makes it sound like you're not serious about programming games. Saying "continue to provide updates" makes it sound like it's not a finished project, which is bad for an internship opportunity. You should say something like "Sole developer and coder for 3d version of classic game" or something like that.

"utilizing PHP, javascript, and various javascript libraries." What technologies you use should be on their own line. Get rid of "various javascript libraries" as it doesn't really make sense. You wouldn't say "various C++ libraries" would you?

Looks a lot better than your previous iteration, but not there yet.
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