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draconar

c++ from zero to hero

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Got this thought in my mind after remembering the joining date of the members from this forum whose replies were the most valuable to me. Most of them joined the forum for 4+ yrs up or so. But what I wanted to know is how much these guys were practicing c++ explicitly. I've been programming for many years but I still can't see the day when I will be endowed with enough c++ details in my mind to call myself a master. What are your thoughts on this? cheers!

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Similar story here, been using C++ for about 15 years, around 7 of those professionally, and I certainly wouldn't call myself an expert, just reasonably well-versed. An interesting aside on this - at the company I'm at right now, part of our pre-interview process is to send out questionnaires asking people to rate themselves at various skills, C++ being one of them. Usually we find it's graduates who rate themselves highest at everything, with scores dropping with experience. :)

edit: I guess part of the reason for this is just the fact that the more you learn, the more you find out you don't know. But also when you're working with a large team with a range of skills and experiences, you meet some very smart people and realise how much more you can learn.

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Same here. I think to become a C++ master, you'd have to use the languange in a lot of different applications for different types of tasks/companies/requirements/etc.

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Quote:
Original post by Hinch
edit: I guess part of the reason for this is just the fact that the more you learn, the more you find out you don't know. But also when you're working with a large team with a range of skills and experiences, you meet some very smart people and realise how much more you can learn.


And the master was enlightened.

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Programming in C++ (actually back when it was "C with classes") for maybe 30 years - only 5-6 sporadic years professionally. I'm comfortable with the language but will never feel I'm a master. Hah. Besides, programming in C++ involves APIs, SDKs, etc., all of which change faster than I can keep up. The best C++ internal code is worthless if you can't interface it to the world.

Working with a team is definitely beneficial. "You can do that?"

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I used C++ for 6 years, and then another 3 professionally. I grew to be reasonably comfortable with the language.

Every other language I've dealt with (and reached that level of competency) took a fraction of the time.

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15 years doin C++, w/ only about 7 years doing it professionally.

Still learning things pretty often (:

For instance someone the other day was telling me a flaw with c++ is that privates should not be in headers. Reason being, when you change a private in a header you have to recompile anything that includes that header even though you haven't changed anything that any other file should care about (barring the use of the friend keyword and perhaps the sizeof(class) of course hehe).

I never saw it like that but it makes sense in a way.

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