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JustChris

Minimum space for Windows 7 development on Boot Camp

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JustChris    150
My programming PC's video card has kicked the bucket and there's no onboard video to fall back on. While waiting on buying a suitable replacement (might take a week or two from now) I will turn my Macbook and Boot Camp for Windows development. I have a copy of Windows 7 RC that I can use for Boot Camp but I was wondering what is the lowest still safe size of partition to make for Windows 7. I have 77 GB of free space left on the laptop. The things I will need for development are Visual Studio Express 2008 and the DirectX SDK. I do not have many projects I plan to work on, just one or two, and have them backed up to an external hard drive as well.

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Ravyne    14300
Firstly, know that you need to have the latest boot-camp to support windows 7, and I'm not entirely sure that the latest bootcamp will work under older versions of OSX, so that may entail having OSX 10.6 as well.

If you're *really* only going to be using it for a couple weeks, you could probably get by on 30GB or so -- probably less honestly, but it'd be a shame to go through all the work of setting up your environment to find out that your partition was too small.

Baseline Windows 7 is ~10GB, IIR, Probably another 1GB per express edition, maybe another gig for the DirectX SDK, and I think MSDN is ~5Gigs if you install that fully -- which is recommended for a laptop that may be away from an available internet connection.

Now, if you think you might keep the windows partition around for awhile after your other machine is back up, then I'd recommend no less than 40GB (if it's used for development, productivity and web duty only, more otherwise.) SInce it seems you don't happen to already have a Windows-based laptop, you might consider keeping it around.

I have a similar setup -- A desktop PC which is my main machine/gaming PC, and I have a macbook (original unibody) which pulls double-duty as my only Mac, and my Windows laptop. Honestly, I run windows on it nearly exclusively (primarily because I don't have any iPhone stuff going on now.) and getting a Windows laptop out of the deal played a large part in justifying the price premium -- even though Apple has rather nice hardware, great build quality, and lots of small perfections that PC vendors don't seem to have (I'll forego raving about their wonderful trackpad, I'm sure you know it's virtues.)

Actually, I recently upgraded to 10.6 and Windows 7 64bit from 10.5 and Windows XP 32bit, and while I was at it I picked up a 500GB harddrive (up from 160) from the local Frys for 90 bucks -- My windows Vista partition is 250GB, with OSX on the remainder of the drive (though I'm thinking of shrinking it down to 160 and putting either a shared FAT32 partition there (so both OSes have read *and* write access -- they can each read from each other's partitions now, but not write to them) or or installing Ubuntu or Suse instead.

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Fiddler    860
Quote:
Original post by JustChris
My programming PC's video card has kicked the bucket and there's no onboard video to fall back on. While waiting on buying a suitable replacement (might take a week or two from now) I will turn my Macbook and Boot Camp for Windows development.

I have a copy of Windows 7 RC that I can use for Boot Camp but I was wondering what is the lowest still safe size of partition to make for Windows 7. I have 77 GB of free space left on the laptop. The things I will need for development are Visual Studio Express 2008 and the DirectX SDK. I do not have many projects I plan to work on, just one or two, and have them backed up to an external hard drive as well.


Win7 64bit + VS2008 Express + DXSDK should be fine in 32GB. If you go for VS2008 Pro or plan to add a VS2010 installation, I'd strongly suggest moving to 40GB.

Keep in mind that you'll generally need to keep 4-5GB of free disk space for optimal performance (necessary temporary files, microsoft update and automatic disk defragmentation). Anything less than that and, for example, service packs for Visual Studio or Windows will fail to install.
Persona

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