• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
SigmaX

Game Designer Portfolio Question

10 posts in this topic

Hey, I have some questions about how to build a game design portfolio. I'm currently working as a game designer for a company that creates casino slot games. These games don't have a credits page, so the only proof I designed any games would be internal to the company. Since I don't draw, and my programming is weak (I have a CS degree but I haven't programmed in 3 years), I'm wondering what else goes into a designer's portfolio? Thanks! --Ed
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It would help if you told us what kind of job you would want to apply to with your portfolio (obviously you have a job or a job idea in mind as you generate your portfolio).
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks Tom for the info. I didn't even realize there was a Forum FAQ button.

I'm really looking for a job as a Game Designer making any other games besides slot games. Platform is not important to me, genera is not that important either. I want to make fun, exciting games that are more main stream.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by SigmaX
....I want to make fun, exciting games that are more main stream.

Then that is what should be in your portfolio. There are a host of game engines/tool sets out there that can be used to create levels/scenarios which will prove that you can do the job. That is what you need in your portfolio.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I suggest diversifying (sp?) content. Versatility is a plus for a game designer. You seem to be attracted to this aspect, I suggest you emphasize on it. Do stuff out of the mainstream as well, simple for the most part. I can't help you much more beyond that I'm affraid. I don't really have the 'clearance' for my advices to be efficient :P
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks for all the feedback. I guess I was hoping that my 6 years experience in the gaming industry (3 as a designer) would be enough.

Now that I'm thinking about creating a portfolio I realize I have a lot more work to do, which I'm actually pretty excited about doing.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
That's a lot of experience though, surely, you'd have lots to talk about during an interview, but yes, if you stuck to doing "your job" and nothing more during these 6 years, I suppose there might be some more flesh to add to the pot (that's what happens when I try to use two different analogies lol). I think the industry craves for people who abide by this.
In a recent interview, I was told they were searching for a candidate that spent most of his spare time having a curiosity for what the job is about. Nothing surprising there, but the fact they even mentionned it makes it that much more important.
The more you can convince them through your portfolio that you spend your nights dreaming of designs, the better it is I assume.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by SigmaX
I guess I was hoping that my 6 years experience in the gaming industry (3 as a designer) would be enough.

I'm guessing your experience doesn't extend to building 3D levels using the level editing tools that go with current gen game engines (including scripting). If it DOES then you current experience will be enough - but if it doesn't then you will need to demonstrate those skills in your portfolio to boost your chances.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
@ Obscure:
I've actually received information from people within the industry that seem to clash with your interpretation (or perhaps I am mistaken).
I was told that knowing 3d engines was the job of level designers and that game designers wouldn't be required to have practical knowledge of them as it could limit their scopes.

I think SigmaX is applying for a game designer job, though I am not aware if he means design at all by that, unaware of the sub-classification between level and game designers. I don't suppose experience with 3d engine would be negative on a portfolio, but should it really be a focus if he isn't going for level designer?

Also, if 3d engines turn out to be relevant, try making Mods of existing game. They're rather an easy way to produce gameplay within instants and demonstrate an understanding of the basic and advanced principles of both gameflow and engine handling.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Orymus
I was told that ... game designers wouldn't be required to have practical knowledge of them as it could limit their scopes.

If anything, knowing how to use level design tools EXPANDS one's "scope" -- rather than limiting it. Although there is a lot of specialization in the industry, it isn't necessary to confine oneself to a very narrow pigeonhole to be hirable/marketable.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0