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JasRonq

Spell based transport as alt to loot haul

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I was going to post a topic asking how to tackle this problem but in thinking and typing I realized the solution I thought of is perfectly good and I will likely use it. Here I would like to present it and ask for your opinions. In most RPGs you are faced with piles of loot to move and sell. Its a grind to collect it all, go to the nearest town, sell, and sometimes go back for another load. I don't like this, but in such games it is usually needed to make enough money to buy the things you want to have in the game. In my game I intend on making loot minimal and immediately usable. For things like weapons and armour you go collect crafting materials and craft them. I believe crafting such items will be for more enjoyable as a route to having those items you want than grinding loot pile to make the money to buy it. Getting to my point though, I realized that there would still be items that would need hauling and I didn't want to force the player to make return trips to drop off items (such as large crafting materials) but with a swamp for a setting, I couldn't just have an easy pack animal following along to haul it for me. What I just came up with though is simply allowing the player to have a glyph spell that is cast on an item and the item is then transported to the destination set. For sparse usage (not 3 items on every body but more like rare large finds) how does this sound for a solution to moving items for the player back to base camp without the player having to walk back himself?

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Original post by JasRonq
I In my game I intend on making loot minimal and immediately usable. For things like weapons and armour you go collect crafting materials and craft them. I believe crafting such items will be for more enjoyable as a route to having those items you want than grinding loot pile to make the money to buy it.


Wouldn't this just cause me to be grinding to get the correct materials to craft that item that I wanted and be picking up a whole heap of materials that only get me items I don't want or already have?

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Original post by JasRonq
What I just came up with though is simply allowing the player to have a glyph spell that is cast on an item and the item is then transported to the destination set. For sparse usage (not 3 items on every body but more like rare large finds) how does this sound for a solution to moving items for the player back to base camp without the player having to walk back himself?


If I have this ability why shouldn't I beable to send any item I want back and also won't I just have to wonder back when I want the item again anyway, so shouldn't I beable to summon the item back aswell? But then if I can do this why not just have an unlimited inventory?

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Original post by Dragoncar
Wouldn't this just cause me to be grinding to get the correct materials to craft that item that I wanted and be picking up a whole heap of materials that only get me items I don't want or already have?

This doesn't even make sense. To address the question as stated though; you wouldn't grind for materials to make items you don't want. Second, who said that getting materials was a lengthy grind? I intend and that sort of thing to be a massive one of find which is why this system is even in place! Imagine instead of collecting 43 whatever, you go out on a quest to find the big one, fight your way to it, claim it, and transport it back.


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Original post by DragoncarIf I have this ability why shouldn't I beable to send any item I want back and also won't I just have to wonder back when I want the item again anyway, so shouldn't I beable to summon the item back aswell? But then if I can do this why not just have an unlimited inventory?

The items you send back are not of general use, they are items with specific purposes outside of common need. I am trying to avoid huge, bloated inventories, and piles of items all over the place.

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What I just came up with though is simply allowing the player to have a glyph spell that is cast on an item and the item is then transported to the destination set. For sparse usage (not 3 items on every body but more like rare large finds) how does this sound for a solution to moving items for the player back to base camp without the player having to walk back himself?

I can't really see the difference to additional inventory space ? You don't said what your inventory is about ? Items have different weights ? Items need more than one inventory slot ? Items can be stacked ?

Why not add some special inventory space, like magic bags which reduce the weight to 0.

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Getting to my point though, I realized that there would still be items that would need hauling and I didn't want to force the player to make return trips to drop off items (such as large crafting materials) but with a swamp for a setting, I couldn't just have an easy pack animal following along to haul it for me.

If your game plays in a fantasy world, a pack animal must not be a donkey. A fantasy creature, like the flying transport creatures in morrowind, could be a solution.

To be honest, inventory management can be a great gameplay feature, if done right. I love to earn my first bigger bags or to start crafting better bags. Pack animals would be a great enhancement to any rpg game. I like it to carry a wagonload full of treasure out of a dungeon and sell it, that's fun for me.

But be careful, a modern inventory system should provide sort and filter functions to support an easier management.

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Torchlight (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torchlight) implements a companion which doubles as a way to sell your unwanted items while in the depths of the caves.

During normal play, the companion can be used in combat. When your inventory gets full, you can send the pet back to the surface with the items you want rid of and he returns shortly after with the profit. He's unavailable for combat during that time. Works quite well.

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Original post by Kenny C
Torchlight (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torchlight) implements a companion which doubles as a way to sell your unwanted items while in the depths of the caves.

During normal play, the companion can be used in combat. When your inventory gets full, you can send the pet back to the surface with the items you want rid of and he returns shortly after with the profit. He's unavailable for combat during that time. Works quite well.


Along these same lines, a summonable familiar could fill a basically identical role for a caster character.

The (Argent Tournament) Squire in WoW that can be made to run errands for you might also be a feature that could be implemented in other settings.

Another option for handling generic loot excess that I've seen is a djinni vendor you can carry with you in his lamp.

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How about infinite storage space that can be access anywhere?

Have the character limited to using items they are "equip," but they have infinite storage space. "Equip" items are items that can be instantly used in battle mode, while storage items cannot be use in battle mode. This way, the player have to decide within limitation of which items they can bring to battle mode. Items should have both weight criteria and size criteria to limit the player from bringing unreasonable quantities of items into battle mode. All other items will stay with the infinite storage space that can be access outside of battle mode.

Of course, this does not work well with some mainstream MMORPG because they don't have a distinct separation between the virtual world from battle modes (you usually don't switch to a lock screen) because there is no over-world.

"When a game force a player to think, players will complain because they cannot think." --Platinum_Dragon

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Returning to town regularly is psychologically important in giving the player the impression that the culture and civilization of the game are real and the player lives within them. Returning to town can also be a nice psychological rest - no one wants to just fight and fight and fight. Aren't you intending to have crafting be done in town?

If you're worried about the annoyance of forcing players to return to town too often, wither give them the ability to teleport there or give them a nice big inventory, problem solved.

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Original post by JasRonq
Imagine instead of collecting 43 whatever, you go out on a quest to find the big one, fight your way to it, claim it, and transport it back.


And what then? Is that it? Straight to the one big score of the game.

That sounds like you've just cut out most of an RPG. So instead of starting small and working your way up you aim to just present the player with a boss and a massive loot score.

The best bit of RPG's is starting with no cash and rubbish weapons and working your way toward better one's. Rather than trying to eliminate the 'grind' you need to find a way to make it interesting.

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Original post by sunandshadow
If you're worried about the annoyance of forcing players to return to town too often, wither give them the ability to teleport there or give them a nice big inventory, problem solved.


Or here is a radical idea:

Do away with the desire to "Loot and dump".

Think about it. Is your character a great warrior? Or some battle field scavenger?

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Thank you, Talroth! some one who seems to get the motivation behind this. Hauling 300 pounds of armour back from a cave is absurd and completely outside the role of a hero, not to mention tedious and even immersion breaking. My original plan was to do away with it entirely but I've realized there are times I may want to transport over sized items and needed a believable way of doing it.

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Original post by Talroth
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Original post by sunandshadow
If you're worried about the annoyance of forcing players to return to town too often, wither give them the ability to teleport there or give them a nice big inventory, problem solved.


Or here is a radical idea:

Do away with the desire to "Loot and dump".

Think about it. Is your character a great warrior? Or some battle field scavenger?


Since I don't personally have any interest in being a great warrior, I usually think of my character as a hunter (of the type who sells the furs and horns for a living). Killing monsters is a boring job, but I like being able to craft the bits into something.

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Personally, I've always liked leaving loot caches around the world when I acquire too much stuff (non multi-player online settings). Every now and then it'd save my butt as I've depleted my equipment. I know that all I have to do is just make it to that one spot, and I'm ok. Teleporting myself or my stuff any time I see fit takes that bit of suspense and planning away. The only times I'm really hauling a lot of junk is when I'm trying to collect trophies of some kind to show off in my house. Otherwise, I'm very happy to leave things places.

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Kseh, that would still be possible. Im only thinking of teleporting items to the destination. Not summoning them back at will. You have to cast the spell on the item you want to teleport, so you have to be there.

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Original post by kseh... Teleporting myself or my stuff any time I see fit takes that bit of suspense and planning away. ...


That. I completely agree with this. I personally would much rather haul loot and have to protect it on the way back(or hide it in the area) than teleport it. Though if I am given the option to teleport, obviously I am going to take the easy way out. I personally am not a fan of dumbing down games. Most mmo's are already simple enough.

I think your system would appeal most to casual gamers.

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