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00Kevin

Dodecagon Grids?

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has anyone tried to create a game based off a Dodecagon grid? I know there are many games with hexagons as the map, but I haven't seen any that have used a Dodecagon in an interesting way. http://gwydir.demon.co.uk/jo/tess/dohexsq.htm http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dodecagon I was thinking that it might be good in some kind of portal type world where the squares would represent pathways to each dimension or lair. Perhaps players could open and close the portals or rotate them around from some reason.

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Because,... they really are just a Hexagonal grid? All that is different is that it is pulled apart slightly, corners got rounded off, and a space is put between each tile. There is no real mathematical difference in using the 'Dodecagon' and a hexagon if you ignore the squares. What is the point to the dodecagon?

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Even hexagons are visual constructs. A map layer can be represented in a Cartesian grid with the coordinates scaled at Y = SQRT(3)X.
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Offsetting the grids at each odd vertical unit will achieve the dodecagon (hexagonal close packing) mapping result.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sphere_packing

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I would suggest that a more appropriate way to look at this is as a connected graph. It's not so much the shape of the tiles that matters, but the functionality that they provide. The area of a tile is irrelevant, only its adjacency is what matters. We only use area tiles because it's easier to keep track of where units are.

Hexagons are used because they connect each node in the graph to 6 other nodes. Using dodecagons, this allows for some nodes to get connected to 6 other nodes, and some nodes to be connected to 2. What you do with that, and if it even makes sense, is entirely dependent on the game you are making.

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You can also consider the effect of having the main unit be larger than the grid unit. For instance if you have a plain square grid, you have 8 directions of movement including the corners. If you scale up your main unit size to a 2x2 grid section but move in 1 grid-square units then you have 16 directions of movement. You end up with each of your normal direction present in the smaller scale, but you gain one more square between each to move into.

My point here is that you don't necessarily need to change the grid to do something interesting or new with the movement.

00Kevin is right, think of what you need, then design a system to create that need.
On the other hand, looking at the rarely used systems can give you inspiration for new ideas. Just be prepared to realize why those systems don't see much use. Its often for good reason.

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Quote:
Original post by 00Kevin
has anyone tried to create a game based off a Dodecagon grid?

I was thinking that it might be good in some kind of portal type world where the squares would represent pathways to each dimension or lair. Perhaps players could open and close the portals or rotate them around from some reason.

It seems you are considering dodecagonal rooms in a 2D world, not a grid.
Are you sure you don't want either a generic planar movement system where you walk freely inside the huge dodecagons or a constrained, abstract system of portals? Both would be simpler and less constrained than a contrived Archimedean grid like the one in the link.

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I would split the game up with having one type of piece that can be on the dodecagon, and another that can be on the hexagon(the shapes in between).

This essentially means that one always have 6 paths of movement available, while another always has 3.
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If I were to make a board game I would follow something along these lines:

Cities are placed on squares. Economic tiles are the smaller hexagons and grant small resource bonuses each turn, Military tiles are to dodecagon and can only be occupied by 1 unit.

At the begining of each turn the player claims an economic tile. Economic tiles grow outwards from the city and can branch outwards slowly(tree like manner)

The player can then buy units. and places them on dodecagons next to a city. Each dodecagon can only have 1 unit.

The play then moves units or attack with them.

_____________

With this balance it essentially means that you can block off you enemy economically if you "block" them with your own economic tiles. It also means that no matter how well you're doing economically you can never build more than 2 units for each city.

For the pieces layout I would probably take the dodecagon with 3 interlocking squares attached to it, which mean that economic pieces will fit in snugly between.

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