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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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Amyrildora

Is it possible to do it all?

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Hello everybody, over the past year and a half Ive been working towards making my first game, im taking lessons on modeling, texturing, animating, programming, etc. *Basically everything BESIDES concept art* Later this year im starting in on sound engineering and all of that good stuff, and as I look for college classes I cant seem to find one that offers all that im trying to learn. So my first question is Does anyone know a good college *such as fullsail* that offers a class that does all that im trying to do. or would I have to take multiple courses My second question being this: Are my goals actually possible? I DO wanna do it all lol It seems very hard for me just to pick one single subject. So is it possible to do all that im trying to do? and be succesful at it? Thanks! Amyrildora.
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Original post by Amyrildora
Are my goals actually possible? I DO wanna do it all lol It seems very hard for me just to pick one single subject. So is it possible to do all that im trying to do? and be succesful at it?
"Whoever aspires to great things must be able to limit himself" -- Goethe

In less philosophical terms, it is good to have at least a cursory knowledge of all the disciplines involved in game development, but to succeed you will need to pick one area as your primary focus.

That said, by the sounds of it you are young, and there is no need to make that determination just yet. Go to college, take a few courses in many different subject areas, and see what feels right...
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So is it possible to do all that im trying to do? and be succesful at it?

If you want to be an indie developer then there is a greater opportunity to do it all. If you want to work at a mainstream development studios then not so much. They require people who specialise in a particular field.
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"Jack of all trades, master of none"

Swiftcoder is absolutely right. It's great to dabble in it all, but to really excel you need to narrow things down.

Being able to work in a team is another important skill to learn. If you play off each other's strengths you'll have a more solid product in the end.
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Original post by SigmaX

"Jack of all trades, master of none"

Swiftcoder is absolutely right. It's great to dabble in it all, but to really excel you need to narrow things down.

Being able to work in a team is another important skill to learn. If you play off each other's strengths you'll have a more solid product in the end.


I think an important question is why would you want to do it all? It is important to know a little bit about everything, but the amount of polish that goes into each part would be a monumental task for one person in most commercial applications.

I've talked to people that wanted this out of a game career, but really what it came down to is that they wanted to do a little bit of everything, then let someone fix all the bugs and issues and things they didn't understand for the final version. I think it comes from a lack of understanding about the amount of work that's really needed to get a professional level end product.

It's great if you think you can legitimately finish a game on your own, it will be a lot of work, and people will probably appreciate the effort. It just needs to be understood that nobody wants to be the guy that fixes all the bugs of the guy that thinks he can do it all so don't bank on finding them, and nobody wants to play a buggy game.

Unless I am misunderstanding your goals.
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Original post by Amyrildora
So is it possible to do all that im trying to do? and be succesful at it?

If you want to be an indie developer then there is a greater opportunity to do it all. If you want to work at a mainstream development studios then not so much. They require people who specialise in a particular field.


I was under that impression, and for the most part, this statement is true.
However, there are a select few places in the industry for people with many facets to their art.
I've seen a select few artists do level design, programming and FX for example. Or people with less game-related knowledge taking on different tasks, including management...

The job of producer, for example, would normally require some kind of knowledge in many fields, without actually having to master them. The basic idea is that you know how to manage these people, understand their logics, deadlines, how a problem can prove a challenge for them, but you do none of the things you have studied... Then again, I've seen producers without that experience too, I suppose having so many strings to your bow is only better on a personal and professionnal level. There is no job per se for this, but you may excel in many jobs by knowing more.

Then again, yes, for now, learn a lot... and then, you'll figure one you'll be better with.
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