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silentassassin2010

Phone Interview?

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Depends on the company, and depends on the level of coding and math. It might be higher coding and math to whittle down candidates further since some might be close, or if the original interview was a little light. It might be a talk with the manager/director about personality and work ethic, especially if the first interview was just with a tech-lead or peers. It might be an interview with the hiring manager or hr to work out salary/benefit expectations...

Who knows? There's not just one standard format for talent evaluation.

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@Telastyn: thanks for the info... I'm a little nervous because its quite a big company, and I'm not bad, like my coding and math skills are quite strong but I make stupid mistakes under pressure, I'd prefer to do something in person :( o well... time will tell.

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Quote:
Original post by silentassassin2010
Hi All, so I got a programming interview which involved coding and math, and now ive been called for another interview next week, what can I expect? more math and programming or just general discussion stuff...?

You say you were called for an interview, but your thread topic says 'phone interview'.

A phone interview generally means that you made their minimum cut, but they aren't quite ready to spend for a face-to-face with several people. They'll ask you some basic questions to make sure you sound like you know the stuff you say on paper. If you look good on paper and sound good with the quick questions, they'll call you in.



During any interview they will ask you questions about basically anything they want. They want to get to know you before you spend the next several years together. You are expected to ask questions back.

They are trying to determine if you will do the job well, and if you will fit in. That includes questions about your technical competencies and personality.

They might ask questions about your programming ability, about your math skills. They might ask about your work history, educational history, details of projects you have done. They might ask questions about what hobbies you have, what music and movies you enjoy, or if you like sports. They just want to get to know the stranger sitting across from them.

There are only a few things they cannot ask you, generally forbidden for discrimination or other legal reasons.


Your questions (and you should be asking questions!) ought to determine if you will be able to do the job they expect, and if you will feel good about working there.

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Was the first interview a phone interview?

Unless you're simply not local to any of their offices, usually you get a phone screen first to check technical competency and then a face-to-face if that goes well. Or perhaps who they want you to interview with isn't local to your local office...

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Anything to do with social networking by any chance?
Normally, when you get a second call, you made it past the first step. Keep going until there are no longer any steps. There isn't much more you can focus on than what you know. Your experience will speak for itself.
Honesty is the key. Don't just staple "tricks of the trade" in the interview. They read these forums as much as you, and they'll know if they've seen the pre-made answer somewhere around. There is no better way to answer a question than your own... unless its specifically a maths question. :P

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I agree with frob.
You have to have questions, and smart questions (prepare with some), and not small technical questions ("What color will the office have?" for example).

It's hard, you have to look into the company in detail, to be able to ask good questions. At least one or two, that may start a little discussion, so be ready with further questions too.

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I suppose its always good to ask about structure. How meetings are held, how the department is managed, what are the dynamics, etc. I find it to be something that evolves according to certain ideologies, and being on the diapason with them on their communication channels can't be bad.

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I would also suggest reading any review related to your prospective company that are posted on GlassDoor or JobVent. Naturally, most of the reviews are negative, but you can sometimes identify common complaints about the company and this can provide you with some insight in the real company culture and give you some questions to (tactfully) ask. They also have a section of interview questions.

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