Sign in to follow this  

How textures are managed in modern games ?

This topic is 2850 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Hi all, I am currently developping a 3D engine, and I came to a hardware question : The GPU's memory is limited, and in nowadays games, developpers and graphists use a lot of different textures for each object. I wondered if these textures were all loaded at the beginning of the "level", or if some of them were loaded on-the-fly during camera moves. Not that I already reached my GPU limits, but if it could come with big levels... even if one uses DDS files. Do anyone know something about GPU memory management ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Memory management is done automatically by the OpenGL driver. It doesn't matter how much gpu memory there is. On some systems, there isn't even any gpu memory. On some systems, there is no gpu and all rendering is done by the cpu, just like the old days.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1GB texture data, all used in a frame with depth-prepass (overdraw minimization), drawing a spiced-up counter-strike:source level on a 256MB geforce8600: performance drops from 86fps down to 78fps.
That's how good gpus are :) .
(ofc, the PCIe doesn't/can't transfer 750-1024MB/frame; the gpu pulls just the smallest texture regions it needs - as if the texels were in a slightly slower VRAM).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This topic is 2850 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this