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What's the absolute state of the art for planning in games?

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SquadSmart doesn't have such a good reputation in industry. If I remember correctly, the samples & code it has a lot of hard-coded behavior that looks suspicious...

I'd suggest looking into the HTN that Killzone 2 uses, slides here:
http://aigamedev.com/open/article/paris09-report/

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IMO, the most advanced planning is being implemented in Panther Games' Airborne Assault series of war games. In these games, the planner is able to set-up and execute complex division and corps maneuvers with unit counts and complexity exceeding most academic problems.
Dave O'Connor shows a little bit of the planners' implementation in presentation for Canberra AIE in 2007.

See:
- ftp://ftp.wargamer.com/pub/Dropzone/depot/CreativeAI.zip (presentation in zip file)
- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HVIOfl7Gt8g (Youtube fan-made guide for small scenario; it gets interesting from 2:30 on. The game's scenarios typically are much larger)

Their new game 'Command Ops: Battles from the Bulge' is expected beginning of May, with richer AI behavior.

Another game series to look at is Creative Assembly's Total War series. The 'Empire' and presumably 'Napoleon' games use GOAP for land battles.

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Quote:
Original post by WilliamvanderSterren
Another game series to look at is Creative Assembly's Total War series. The 'Empire' and presumably 'Napoleon' games use GOAP for land battles.


I wish they would use it on the world map too, where its obviously some sort of reactive AI running. Army merge, separate, merge, separate, til their movement points are over. Classic reactive AI non-converging.

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The last game i was working on used Kynapse, but it left much to be desired.

It was better than plenty of others i'm sure, but it had some pitfalls that weren't that great.

Kynapse uses a navmesh type system and would automatically generate navmesh based on your level data which is cool, but how it did it was basically it dif a sphere flood fill on your map (ie raycasts) to get a really dense grid of points, and then it would simplify that grid as much as it could.

Nicer than having to create your own navmesh but the process took forever - as in weeks of continuous processing for our world which was admitedly pretty big. We ended up generating navmesh sections in tiles and stitching them together.

It seems like using A* to search navmesh is how most modern games do path planning these days (:

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Quote:
Original post by Atrix256
The last game i was working on used Kynapse, but it left much to be desired.

It was better than plenty of others i'm sure, but it had some pitfalls that weren't that great.

Kynapse uses a navmesh type system and would automatically generate navmesh based on your level data which is cool, but how it did it was basically it dif a sphere flood fill on your map (ie raycasts) to get a really dense grid of points, and then it would simplify that grid as much as it could.

Nicer than having to create your own navmesh but the process took forever - as in weeks of continuous processing for our world which was admitedly pretty big. We ended up generating navmesh sections in tiles and stitching them together.

It seems like using A* to search navmesh is how most modern games do path planning these days (:


I believe the OP was asking about planing the AI`s action, not planning its movement. Tho A* is often used in both cases.

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