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turlisk

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turlisk    103
A quick question that i have, being in the IT field currently and studying game design while working, alot of the same question keep coming up and being asked. I did some research and could not really find a previous topic about this. Also on google i had a hard time finding an answer. Because of this i thought asking here would be the best place. The question that keeps coming up is the following. Are there any certifications that would help in this field? Like in networking you have the cisco degrees and in hardware you have the a+ certificate. Are there any programming (c++) or standard game design certificates out there or is it just degree's?

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M2tM    948
Full Sail offers a pretty good course I've heard if you are looking for a game certificate program. You will want to do some of your own research into the matter of course.

Otherwise you'd be looking for some form of university Computer Science or Software Engineering degree which would likely be a 4 year program and much more intense than Full Sail in maths and other areas.

There is no one C++ certificate as no company really owns the language. It has multiple contributors and is largely an open effort.

You -can- get into the games industry without any formal documents provided you have an -awesome- resume and portfolio and some industry experience... But this is kind of a cyclical problem and it's kind of rare to actually pull off. That said, if you have a resume and portfolio and it is impressive but no industry experience you could look into internship. Most programs require you be in school or just recently finished school.

I know another developer who started out in university, got a job at EA, and then just stayed and is now working at another studio. So it is possible.

I don't have my degree, but I think I've got a decent chance of landing a job, so we'll see how that works out. I wouldn't recommend you try to skip this step if you can afford to go and have time. The limited industry experience I do have is because I was in university and was able to use the coop program to net an internship.

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Tom Sloper    16062
Quote:
Original post by turlisk
Are there any certifications that would help in this field?

Like in networking you have the cisco degrees and in hardware you have the a+ certificate.

Are there any programming (c++) or standard game design certificates out there or is it just degree's?

Unclear what basis you're asking from. If you mean "to get a job," then we expect you to have a degree, not just a certificate. And a portfolio. You can take a degree in one subject, get a certificate in "this field" (depending on what you meant by that term), and that should be okay... if you have a good enough portfolio too.

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frob    44974
Quote:
Original post by turlisk
The question that keeps coming up is the following. Are there any certifications that would help in this field?

Like in networking you have the cisco degrees and in hardware you have the a+ certificate.

Are there any programming (c++) or standard game design certificates out there or is it just degree's?
A certification is just another chunk of evidence about your ability to do the job. Nothing more.


An A+ certificate is to show that you have some minimum training in technical support. If you were trying to get a job handling technical support calls, then sure, the certificate might help. It shows that you probably require slightly less training than the next help desk applicant.


If you are programming the networking infrastructure, then sure, a traditional degree plus a Cisco certification might help you over somebody with just a degree. It shows that you have had a bit more training on the system, nothing more.


A certificate counts for very little when hiring. If I had two candidates that otherwise appeared equally skilled and educated, then a certification might make a difference in the decision. Generally there are other items that far outweigh it in importance.


Certificates are important for less-skilled jobs. The call centers that handle technical support care about getting A+ certification because there are many unskilled and untalented individuals. The certificate is akin to getting a food handler's permit -- it is generally required and shows you at least read the documentation once.

Professional jobs, which include programmers, artists, designers, and so forth, are in a very different situation. The specific classes you've attended are not significant once you hit mainstream professional development. More important are long-term trends and major activities.

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