Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  
gamby

Learning Guidance

This topic is 3163 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Hey all, name is Jason. I am currently enrolled in Game Simulation and Programming degree at DeVry (although I just recently read some comments that DeVry isn't a great school and is laughed at, true?). I have recently finished C++ class, and am reading more books on C++ to learn more and as refresher (I am currently deployed so I have lots of time to read, but not able to continue my schooling). I am looking to get ahead and am ordering some books, including learning OpenGL and DirectX10. However, I am not too sure exactly where to continue from here. I am decent with my C++, having produced the typical TicTacToe and a number guess DOS game. I have MS Visual Studio that I am decently comfortable with. Any suggestions on where I should move onto? Looking to up myself out of the DOS and into trying 2D, and eventually into 3D. Would like to try myself into a scrolling type 2D game or Asteroids type game before the end of this deployment in March 2011. Any help is much appreciated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
Quote:
Original post by gamby
I am currently enrolled in Game Simulation and Programming degree at DeVry (although I just recently read some comments that DeVry isn't a great school and is laughed at, true?).
Partly true.

Most of the DeVry schools do not offer a true Computer Science degree. A "programming" degree is not equivalent to a CS degree. You will very likely find yourself missing very important background knowledge. You will also have a harder time finding a job.

Quote:
I have recently finished C++ class, and am reading more books on C++ to learn more and as refresher (I am currently deployed so I have lots of time to read, but not able to continue my schooling).
Few courses teach you the actual C++ language. They teach you what the teacher learned before standardized C++, or they teach you their own interpretation of the language.

Here's the standard list of books. These people are all involved in the language standards committee. Read them mostly in the order listed:

# "Accelerated C++" Andrew Koenig and Barabara Moo
# "The C++ Standard Library" Nicolai Josuttis
# "Effective C++" Scott Meyers
# "More Effective C++" Scott Meyers
# "Effective STL" Scott Meyers
# "Exceptional C++" Herb Sutter
# "More Exceptional C++" Herb Sutter

That will give you an above-average understanding of the C++ language.
Quote:
I am looking to get ahead and am ordering some books, including learning OpenGL and DirectX10. However, I am not too sure exactly where to continue from here.
For OpenGL, look at the OpenGL Red Book. There is an online version from the 1.1 edition that has been floating around since 1996 or so. Ignore it, unless you want to learn the graphics system as it existed before hardware acceleration. The Red Book is the definitive "start here" book for OpenGL.

For DirectX, there are many books out there, and lots of sites that describe the pros and cons to each. There is no definitive "start here" book, but there are thousands of web sites with tutorials and walkthroughs of varying quality.

/edit: fix link

[Edited by - frob on April 16, 2010 4:58:41 PM]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by gamby
...DeVry isn't a great school and is laughed at, true?...


A school like Devry doesn't look as good on a resume as a traditional university. I can't attest to the quality of classes there, but curriculums vary widely between different schools. A good technical school will get you a better education than a shitty traditional school. So don't become discouraged.

Regardless of where you go to school, most of what you need to know to write games has to be learned independently. There is just so much to learn. It's more than "knowing DirectX whatever". A pianist has all the notes he can play laid out before him, but it still takes a decade to become a musician. Similarly, you could know every single part of the OpenGL standard and still have trouble putting together a game.

For reference, it's not "DOS". DOS was the OS your computer ran in 1990. What you are programming for is called a "terminal" or a "console". Don't call it DOS :P

Asteroids would be a great start. My suggestion would be to learn SDL, a library written in C that provides a very simple window and rendering API (and also supports OpenGL).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks for the headsup. I currently am reading the Accelerated C++, glad to know somewhat on the right track. I was afraid I was spending pointless amounts of money at DeVry (thankfully military pays majority of tuition costs). Guess I'll start looking for a transfer, any recommended schools?

I'm not looking to be an automatic game programmer. I know its gonna take years and years, and I'm trying to learn during my freetime (while not playing my PS3 or computer games). This is definetly the best site I have found so far in pursuing further knowledge in the field. Any other recommended sites/communities?

Again, appreciate your help and straightforwardness.


PS. I won't ever call it DOS again. I couldn't think of the proper term. =)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by gamby
Guess I'll start looking for a transfer, any recommended schools?
Any school you can afford that offers an accredited Computer Science degree. Not a programming degree. Not a computer technology degree. Not a game development degree. Actual Computer Science. It's fine to have an emphasis within the program, and some schools do offer CS degrees with game development emphasis.

I usually recommend whatever state school you can afford. Few employers care which school you attended, as long as it was a proper Computer Science degree.

I prefer smaller state schools because smaller normally means the students get more attention and feedback. Larger schools are easier for slackers to slip through the cracks, to coast, to not learn, and otherwise not flourish.

Big-names schools are more expensive. Some people think it helps, others think that it hurts, to attend a big name. One side says you have a more thorough education, the other side that you have money to burn or can't work as hard or may have an ego. Many interviewers simply don't care what school you attended.

Talk to the Computer Science department at the schools you consider, figure out what they expect from you, figure out what environment will best help you grow. Being in a comfortable environment will improve your odds of success.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Microsoft Direct3D 11 has been added 3 important features compared to Direct3D 10: Tesselation, Compute Shader and Multithreaded Rendering, which makes images more real, more attractive and performance better.

Here is a benchmark video

http://www.bing.com/videos/watch/video/unigine-heaven-2-0-benchmark-directx-11-with-hardware-tessellation/56a453acd4470a72043b56a453acd4470a72043b-1760874332575

Here are my suggestions to learn Direct3D.

1) Download the latest DirectX SDK and install it. You can find many tutorials and samples too.

http://www.bing.com/videos/watch/video/unigine-heaven-2-0-benchmark-directx-11-with-hardware-tessellation/56a453acd4470a72043b56a453acd4470a72043b-1760874332575

2) Find the book "Introduction to 3D Game Programming With DirectX 10" written by Frank D Luna". I feel this book is vesy good for beginners. It not only shows you how to write code, but also tells you about Direct3D behind APIs.

3) Some web sites to get helps and learning materials, beside this site

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/directx/bb896725.aspx
http://creators.xna.com/en-US/

[Edited by - standby01 on April 19, 2010 4:29:17 PM]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks Frob. I prefer small colleges as well so its easier to get assistance from the professors. Right now tuition cost isn't much of a problem for me since the US Army pays 100% tuition costs while active duty. Its more of a convenience factor for me right now because of the inability to actually attend classes (because of deployments, training exercises, etc) so really limits me to online courses, which is why I had originally signed up with DeVry because it was one of the few schools associated with the US Army's tuition program and had programming degree for the game industry and classes were online.

Thanks standby01 for the links. Unfortunately government systems block almost everything related to gaming (surprised this site isn't blocked to be honest) and so I can't access those. My wife will be downloading alot of tutorials and SDK's for me and mailing them to me here in Afghanistan. Right now though, I'm trying to further my understanding of C++ and hopefully begin into win32 from console soon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

GameDev.net is your game development community. Create an account for your GameDev Portfolio and participate in the largest developer community in the games industry.

Sign me up!