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teviathon

GNU/Linux Distributions

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Most distributions are ok for programers, all of them have the compilers you need. You just need to choose the right editor/IDE, just download some from the sofrware center and keep what you like.

Zenwalk or Slackware might be worth a look as they have some extra tools installed (especially Zenwalk), but don't bother if you are new to linux, get ubuntu.

This might help you in choosing the right distro.

edit: link fixed
another edit: After some googling, οpenSUSE seems to be trying to "Dramatically simplify and open the development and packaging processes to make openSUSE the platform of choice for Linux hackers and application developers. "

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One other thing, you might want to take a look at some screenshots, see if you'd prefer GNOME or KDE. You can install both environments but I find Ubuntu is far cleaner and snappier when you stick to GTK+ applications. Other distros like openSUSE have more experience with having both installed.

I'm a GNOME user but I also prefer command line tools. Arguably KDE/Qt has better GUI tools, including Qt Creator, Kdevelop 4 which just went stable, Kcachegrind, etc.

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Quote:
Original post by 00chris00
Most distributions are ok for programers, all of them have the compilers you need. You just need to choose the right editor/IDE, just download some from the sofrware center and keep what you like.

Zenwalk or Slackware might be worth a look as they have some extra tools installed (especially Zenwalk), but don't bother if you are new to linux, get ubuntu.

This might help you in choosing the right distro.

edit: link fixed
another edit: After some googling, οpenSUSE seems to be trying to "Dramatically simplify and open the development and packaging processes to make openSUSE the platform of choice for Linux hackers and application developers. "

Yeah I'd recommend openSuse over Ubuntu especially if got bandwidth.
Default Ubuntu doesn't even come with gcc compiler installed :(
openSuse even includes Mono in latest distro last time I checked

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Quote:
Original post by daviangelDefault Ubuntu doesn't even come with gcc compiler installed :(

:o Seriously? It can be easily installed though:
$sudo apt-get install gcc build-essential

Never tried OpenSUSE, looks like a good distro to start with as a programer.

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Quote:
Original post by 00chris00
Quote:
Original post by daviangelDefault Ubuntu doesn't even come with gcc compiler installed :(

:o Seriously? It can be easily installed though:
$sudo apt-get install gcc build-essential

Never tried OpenSUSE, looks like a good distro to start with as a programer.

It may be easy enough for someone that already know Linux but you really think someone new is going to have a clue type all that let alone know what it all means?

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Quote:
Original post by daviangel
It may be easy enough for someone that already know Linux but you really think someone new is going to have a clue type all that let alone know what it all means?

On Ubuntu, you just hover the little mouse-thing over the Applications menu until it drops down, move the mouse-thing down to "Ubuntu Software Center", select "Programming", then click on, say, "Qt Creator." Everything you need will be installed and just work.

Compare and contrast that with, say, Microsft Windows. It does not come with a compiler. Finding the compiler is impossible, although you can find an "IDE" that will also install a compiler but is not useful unless you install an "SDK" and run some program to link the "SDK" to the "IDE". Gosh, why can't Linux be more like Windows?

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Quote:
Original post by 00chris00
Quote:
Original post by daviangelDefault Ubuntu doesn't even come with gcc compiler installed :(

:o Seriously? It can be easily installed though:
$sudo apt-get install gcc build-essential

Never tried OpenSUSE, looks like a good distro to start with as a programer.


I think the point of not including the compiler is that they want to push developer into packaging their software instead of only releasing sourcecode. (Having to compile software yourself isn't something ordinary users want to do)

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I use SUSE Linux Enterprise at work (not latest version) and Ubuntu at home, my favorite is Ubuntu and I recommend it.
I can also recommend QtCreator, it is an IDE comparable to Visual C++.
Installing software under Ubuntu is very easy, just use the software center.


Ubuntu works out of the box on both my PC and Netbook, NVidia drivers were downloaded and installed automatically (there will be a notification that drivers are available on first or second boot if you have internet connection). If you are not familiar with Linux, Ubuntu is the right distribution.

[Edited by - Kambiz on May 5, 2010 3:22:47 PM]

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