Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  
zyrolasting

Standing out - Is there really a "right" way?

This topic is 2996 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

I've been pressured since I left the womb to get a degree with the "you need that piece of paper" lecture, but I'm also being told by more and more people that degrees do not matter if you are skilled. People with jobs I don't care about insist I get a degree, but people with jobs I like never even went to college.

I'm still learning, but firms always seem to want someone who can commit and contribute to the well being of the company. No matter what route is taken, I always seem to be pursuing the goal of being trustworthy in my chosen career. On one hand, I have been told that college is not "experience", and all I will get is documentation that says I can be trusted. I have also been informed (by a professor, no less) that practicing, networking, and advertising oneself is all that is necessary whether schooling is involved or not.

I want to clear away fog. Does it really matter how I "prove myself" as long as I do just that? Is the portfolio, resume and people skills where getting a job always comes down to, or is there some magic element that I am missing that only a formal education (or lack thereof) can provide?

It all seems to come down to kicking ass and taking names. [disturbed]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
Who do you know? If you know the hiring manager at "insert place you want to work" then your buddy will give you a job, if he thinks you can do it. It doesn't matter if you have a degree or not. If you aren't buddies with hiring manager at "insert place you want to work" then you have to convince him that you are better than all the other applicants (and hope he doesn't have any friends who want the job). How do you convince the hiring manager that you are the best guy for the job? You have to impress him personally(Be a nice likable guy at the interview) and professionally(have a portfolio that shows you kick butt). In the end if it comes down to you with out a degree and Joe with a degree why not take Joe he has one more check box than you, even if that check box means nothing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by zyrolasting
I want to clear away fog. Does it really matter how I "prove myself" as long as I do just that?

What qualifications you have don't matter if you have years of industry experience (which you don't).
If you are an entry level applicant trying to break into the industry there are several ways you can prove yourself:
1. A degree
2. A portfolio
3. Well formatted CV & application letter
4. Good interview skills

If you have all the above then you have a better chance of getting a job than if you only have some of the above. Some companies (mainly large ones) will dump your CV in the bin if you don't have a degree, some wont. So you can get a job without a degree but it will be harder. A degree also makes it much easier should you ever decide to work abroad.

Also a degree is not just a piece of paper - it is a life experience (not to be confused with "work experience"); one that many who experienced say is very worthwhile. It is part of developing you as a person.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
It is part of developing you as a person.


That is way too open to interpretation, as is "life experience". What do you consider to be a developed person, and how does college contribute to their development? Only social skills come to mind here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by zyrolasting
Quote:
It is part of developing you as a person.

That is way too open to interpretation, as is "life experience". What do you consider to be a developed person, and how does college contribute to their development? Only social skills come to mind here.

What comes to your uninformed mind is far less than what comes to our educated and experienced minds.
The four years of college give you time to learn a lot, not only the stuff you are taught in classes but also about managing money (something you didn't really have to do in high school) and even about applying yourself. Hopefully you take work during the summer breaks, and that provides you with useful experience in the workaday world. During the four years of college/university, you also learn a lot about your own likes and dislikes.
In general, fresh college/university grads are more "mature" than fresh high school grads.
By the way, you totally blew off everything else that was said to you and just spent all your energy on the final nine words of Dan's excellent post. I suggest you take another look at the rest of what he wrote and what the other respondent wrote, and consider those thoughts as well.
All the above notwithstanding, if you are dead set on not going to college/university, that's fine. In about six or seven years, you could well be ready to apply for a game job, then when you get it, you are free to thumb your nose at us and all the advice you got above.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
A college degree with awesome projects or 3-5+ years of professional AAA experience or I won't even look at your resume. The age of people getting into the industry without a college degree is basically over with few exceptions.

These days, you might get a job without a college degree and no professional experience, but you also might win the lottery.... Same odds.

-me

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
you totally blew off everything else that was said to you and just spent all your energy on the final nine words of Dan's excellent post. I suggest you take another look at the rest of what he wrote and what the other respondent wrote, and consider those thoughts as well. All the above notwithstanding, if you are dead set on not going to college/university, that's fine. In about six or seven years, you could well be ready to apply for a game job, then when you get it, you are free to thumb your nose at us and all the advice you got above.


Please avoid ill-founded deconstructionist thinking. Everything before (and after) this stunt was useful information, and were valid answers I took into account despite your accusations. Like any other forum goer, I question what I think needs further clarification.

Quote:
A college degree with awesome projects or 3-5+ years of professional AAA experience or I won't even look at your resume. The age of people getting into the industry without a college degree is basically over with few exceptions


What do you do? Any particular degrees you favor? (CS, CPE...)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by zyrolasting -- brackets added by Tom Sloper

Everything before (and after) [your post] was useful information... I [only comment on or] question what I think needs further clarification.

Ah. Glad to have that information, and I'm sure the other posters are pleased to know that you are grateful for their useful information.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by zyrolasting
What do you do? Any particular degrees you favor? (CS, CPE...)


Was a: AI Programmer for 5 years on RTS and RPS games
Am a: Game Designer elsewhere now

Degree depends on what you do. BS in CS for programmer is the most common. More or less anything for a designer as long as you have strong portfolio work.

-me

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This topic is 2996 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

We are the game development community.

Whether you are an indie, hobbyist, AAA developer, or just trying to learn, GameDev.net is the place for you to learn, share, and connect with the games industry. Learn more About Us or sign up!

Sign me up!