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Phantom63

I made Tic TacToe now I am ready to make my MMORPG

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Just kidding but I dont know were to go from here. I want to start going to graphics but I dont think im ready yet. Im learning C++ and im wondering what are some things I should defiantly learn before I move to graphics? Also what are some projects I could do to learn these things?

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Why do you think you are not ready for graphics?
Even 2D graphics? IMHO 2D graphics would be the next step. With or without libraries (SDL for example).
Look into linear algebra (but you don't need much for a 2D game).
I say the best way to learn is by doing. If you encounter a problem in practice, look into that particular problem/topic.

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I might try it but there are still some topics I havent really covered yet pointers for example. I was really just wondering what are the topics I must know before I move on to more advanced programming.

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Check this out:

http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/

Thats where I started. Once youve understood everything from Basics of C++ to Object Oriented Programming you can start messing with serious stuff. The advanced concepts ARE important later on. But you will know yourself when the time comes to learn that stuff.

As for now, make sure you understand everything there and once you do. Go on to something simple like 2D DirectX programming or even 3D. This here is a good site to show how this stuff works:

http://www.directxtutorial.com/Tutorial9/tutorials.aspx

If your not into DX then try openGL. Or actualy. Instead of going this far and making something from scratch. You might want to try creating a game modification with C++. If you have Half Life 2, id suggest you get started there. Make a new mod and start tampering with bits of the code untill you understand what does what. Heres the Wiki for it:

http://developer.valvesoftware.com/wiki/SDK_Docs

Anyway, you can also mess with Ogre, its a open source 3D engine. But other than that. Good luck!

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Quote:
Original post by Phantom63
I might try it but there are still some topics I havent really covered yet pointers for example. I was really just wondering what are the topics I must know before I move on to more advanced programming.


You really can't learn the concepts independently of learning how to use them. There also isn't a set curriculum for how to learn various programming topics. Some people will learn Concept X after six weeks of programming, and others won't need it until they've been happily hacking along for six years.

The best way to learn is to do. In the course of trying new projects and tackling new challenges, you'll naturally find things that you need to learn how to do, and learn them.

So at this point, I'd say pick something you're interested in accomplishing, and just go for it [smile]

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Quote:
Original post by szecs
Why do you think you are not ready for graphics?
Even 2D graphics? IMHO 2D graphics would be the next step. With or without libraries (SDL for example).
Look into linear algebra (but you don't need much for a 2D game).
I say the best way to learn is by doing. If you encounter a problem in practice, look into that particular problem/topic.


My first game was a Scorched Earth clone. Not the easiest thing. But when I encountered a problem, I looked into it, and learnt it by doing it. Before that, I only made a guess the number thing, a prime number statistic finder/printer/whatever thing+a very simple graphic program (plotting a function) for a school assignment.

Oh, and a thing I say all the time: learning from just books without practice is a waste of time.
You learn stuff with struggling, boring to death in a year, while you could learn those stuff in a month or two if you make programs as well and have a good time too.

A lot of guys make the mistake. No wonder why are quite a lot of "lost motivation" threads. And threads that show that the person after a year or more learning is totally stunned when it comes to actual coding and problem solving.

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People learn in different ways. There are people out there who can read a book and intuitively grasp the concepts.

For me, personally, I think I learn better by doing, and then referencing a book, forum, or website when I get "stuck."

As I try to implement ideas I have for a game, I'll run into something I don't know how to handle from a coding perspective. But I know what I want the game/code to *do* so I can then search for how to do what I want. That helps me understand how a particular programming concept can be applied to situations I might encounter as I engage in my hobby, rather than try to learn a new concept that I can't visualize because the examples are unfamiliar or uninteresting.

I found trying to implement text versions of various simple board, dice, or card games, or even "porting" old text-based games I played into my language of choice (C++) to be a huge help in terms of getting a handle on basic concepts. Not every game you write at this stage has to be commercial-worthy. Create a simple text-based interface so that you can make sure the game is working as intended, then move on to something else.

When you want to start graphics, realize that most of the programming concepts are the same regardless of the API/API-wrapper you use, rather than getting caught up in which is better or getting overwhelmed with memorizing lines of initialization code and trying to figure out where to stick it. That got me hung up for a good couple months until I decided to simplify some with SDL. Once I got into learning SDL, I had the epiphany the various initializaiton and basic graphic elements of my games were essentially the same regardless of exactly how I have to implement them in SDL, DirectX, OpenGL, or whatever.

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