Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  
Zambaku

I am so frustrated

This topic is 2903 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

I am so frustrated with myself. For years I've wanted to make arcade games like Donkey Kong and Space Invaders. My projects are stacking up and it's very depressing not being able to make the transition from paper to software due to that I can't learn any programmng language. I've tried everything from Qbasic too C++, I just can't think in programming syntax.

The only software I was any good with was TGF2 and MMF2, but they had the little drawbacks of becoming very laggy if you added to much stuff.

I've also tried Game Maker but it's just to messy for me.

Are there any simple softwares out there that could be used for making simple arcade games?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
Don't try to create your own engine if you are not a programmer or have the ability to do so. Use generic engines, like Torque, Unity, UDK, or similars. Although, scripting ability is always required for complex games.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Unity is good, I haven't kept up with it recently, but I heard its 2d stuff needs work still (something they were planning on addressing last I heard, maybe they have already.)

Flash is a fairly simple and visual platform that a lot of people make 2d games with. That may also be an option, but it does involve programming.

Game Maker basically is the one I can think of that is designed for non-programmers making 2d games.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It's natural you can't think in programming syntax. It's called code for a reason. It's a LANGUAGE. Like any other language, no one naturally understands it and it will take time before you can make a game. If you try making a game without knowing how to program, it'll be a slap to the face.

I personally just recommend learning a programming language or scripting language. These are what give you the most flexibility in terms of making games.

Frustration is natural at first. It's natural even for experienced programmers. It all relates to how much you understand. Start small and gradually use increasingly advanced concepts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I don't have a lot of help for, aside from advice, because if you want to be able to develop game you will have to learn something a lot more complex. I will tell you from experience, and maybe this will help you out a little. If you are planning on learning a programming language, don't think in terms of making games right away, that is taking on way to much at once that can easily overwhelm yourself and end up feeling like "How do they know how to do that?", I started with C++ and it took sometime before I was making games that wasn't in console, actually about 1 year into college I was finally making my very first DirectX game in 2D and it was a lot of work, what took me 4 weeks to complete would take me like 2 full days now.

The reason I am stating this is maybe you feel like you are not getting the syntax, but really you are just rushing the process, especially since you say you have tried learning everything from "this to that". It is best to find one and stick with it, chances are you will not be ready to make games with graphics just from a few books. You mention Flash, I recommend this for one reason, it is visual from the start with being able to draw objects on the fly than give it purpose. I would say start with C#, make console programs, start off really simple like random number game, to stuff like hangman. Once you feel like you are comfortable with C# take a good look at XNA, now before you get ahead of yourself, do not jump right to XNA, again you are going to overwhelm yourself and feel like you are not getting it. I went through this in my first year of college when I tried making a game 4 months after learning C++ I took a C# class and then jumped right into XNA and I felt like I just wasn't getting it.

I am not sure if this really helps you, but this is my experience I had and I have been where you have been, except I had school to push me in the right direction without being able to quit due to frustration. If you start believing you can't don't expect to be able to achieve what you want, you just need direction and commitment at this point, but if ultimately you don't like programming you will probably be stuck to simple tools to make games are the more advanced that require scripting which is often like programming itself. I hope this helps you out and maybe gives you a piece of mind about the idea of making games. Good luck to you and hope to see you on there later on posting your game or things you need help understanding.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I agree with what Wicked357 posted and that you need to decide how far you are willing to go to make a game.

Stick with a programming language and put in the hours to practice. I consider C to be the best place to start as it provides an excellent foundation for going on to learn other languages such as C++, C# and Java.

If you can stick with C long enough you can try your hand at a command-line console game. Back in 2000, I had spent six months learning C and spent a further month or so writing a text RPG game and without the burden of graphics, sound and music, it was the most rewarding programming experience I ever had.

One mistake I made after that first game was rushing off to make a Scrolling shoot-em-up in C++ and DirectX 7. If I could have that time again, I would have spent more time learning C++ and then the Windows API. Then I would have updated my text rpg to include some simple graphics using GDI.

Only then should I have jumped into DirectX and made a simple Asteroids or Space Invaders clone...

Do you see? Learning the skill to make games is not earned over night, and can take years of dedication. Once you've got the hang of programming, though, it becomes an incredible adventure in it's own right.

Learn to walk before you can run and you'll do well. Best of luck mate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lemme agree with the above posters. Know what language you wanna use.
He suggests C, that's fine if you're completely new, but whatever you know best is good.
Find your language, draft your ideas, then research the individual engine/API components, and have at some fun.

don't stress, but don't rush either. not good

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
One thing that may help you is making daily "goals". I do this all the time and its how I'm getting better at 3D modeling and iPad programming quickly (although be advised, quickly is not what you are aiming for if you have never programmed before.).

What I would say is pick a language, C# and XNA seem to be a popular choice. Learn C# from a few different books, making your daily goals to learn how to do a particular feature in that language. Don't worry about trying to remember every little bit of syntax, you will be referencing often, make sure you understand the concepts and how they fit into making a program.

Once you reach XNA, this is where daily goals really help. Start by making it a goal to make a window open. Get comfortable with that then make your next goal to display a background image, and so on. Keep adding bits and pieces until you have what you need to make a game, and make sure you start super small. Even the simplest sounding games are rather complex.

Eventually you will look back on what you did and wonder how you ever thought it was difficult.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pick the one thing on your list that you think you will be able to achieve easily enough, but at the same time challenges you at least a little and just do it.

It's better to follow one idea through to completion than it is to have 50 ideas that never see the light of day. It probably wont be your most extravagent idea but if you stick at finishing things you're bound to finish that too when you've got enough practice in.

Never be afraid of mistakes. Mistakes are how we learn. The only true mistake is one that you didn't learn from.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

Participate in the game development conversation and more when you create an account on GameDev.net!

Sign me up!