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GraySnakeGenocide

Would I be better off using the 3D Buzz C#/XNA tutorials or the Sams book?

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My goal in life is to make games, not specifically for a single console (which is my main problem with XNA).

The upside to the 3D Buzz tutorials, is that it shows me how the code makes the games work.

I have the Sams Teach Yourself C# book, but in the first day chapter, it just throws a bunch of crap at me that bores me to sleep. This may have everything I need to learn C#, but I don't know how I can commit to it considering I can't keep interest.

I also have the Blender 3D Noob To Pro book, as well as a Python book. Those 2 will interact at some point I believe.

So how do I go about this? Should I stick with the 3D Buzz tutorials first? I figure once I finish them, I could find a way to program the games without using XNA.

I feel like such an idiot, I keep asking and asking and asking, and yet I never make any progress :/.

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If you get bored to sleep and give up on the very first chapter in your C# book, maybe programming just isn't for you. Or you need to force yourself to put in the hours needed to learn. Just read the book already. AND watch the tutorials. Write little programs, then google for more tutorials, and read/watch those aswell. Get more books. Repeat for 5-10 years, and you'll be set.

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I personally find big fat books like that sams book better for reference. Generally I'll do the first few chapters, start writing little projects, if I get stuck or don't know how to do something I'll flick to the relevant chapter and learn about it.

Forcing yourself through a book means you'll take a lot less in, you'll skim over bits just to get to the end. I've found for me, this approach works, I find the examples in books are often boring, so I come up with my own. I might learn the material covered in the book a little slower but I feel I get more out of it.

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Quote:
Original post by Brian Sandberg
If you get bored to sleep and give up on the very first chapter in your C# book, maybe programming just isn't for you. Or you need to force yourself to put in the hours needed to learn. Just read the book already. AND watch the tutorials. Write little programs, then google for more tutorials, and read/watch those aswell. Get more books. Repeat for 5-10 years, and you'll be set.


5-10 years?? Making an MMORPG maybe.
You can make playable (and played) games after a year of CODING. If you are smart and talented: half year of CODING.

CODING, no just reading books!!
CODE, CODE, CODE
And read those similar threads started here 3 times a day. FAQ etc. This question is asked all the time. It's getting tiring to type all the same advices again and again.

Sorry, it's not you.

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Original post by Jonny_S
I personally find big fat books like that sams book better for reference. Generally I'll do the first few chapters, start writing little projects, if I get stuck or don't know how to do something I'll flick to the relevant chapter and learn about it.

Forcing yourself through a book means you'll take a lot less in, you'll skim over bits just to get to the end. I've found for me, this approach works, I find the examples in books are often boring, so I come up with my own. I might learn the material covered in the book a little slower but I feel I get more out of it.


This approach works not just for you. This IS the way to learn programming.

Do you want to learn sex from books? No. You want (and can only) learn sex in the real life.

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Original post by szecs
5-10 years?? Making an MMORPG maybe.
You can make playable (and played) games after a year of CODING. If you are smart and talented: half year of CODING.


Oh yes, it doesn't have to take long to be able to do something, especially these days where libraries will do most of the work for you. However, it's the common wisdom that it takes around 10.000 hours (preferably before the age of 20) to achieve mastery of any subject. And you won't get there with a work ethic involving stopping on the first chapter on your "introduction to programming" book because it's boring.

We should probably have some stickies titled "I want to make games using X - where to start".

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Re: GraySnakeGenocide.

I'm going to throw a guess and say that you're having trouble either downloading Visual C# or the exercises in the book are generating errors and you're at a loss as to what you've done wrong.

Am I right?

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No, everything is downloaded fine. It's just in day 1 of the book, it was throwing a bunch of this cryptic looking code in the very beginning, rather than start small. But I skipped passed that part since thats only showing how to compile/etc. I already know all of that junk.

I just want to get to the point where I can at least program a text based game without having to constantly look up the type of code i'd need to use.

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I just want to get to the point where I can at least program a text based game without having to constantly look up the type of code i'd need to use.
There's two sides to the appropriate response. The first is that you shouldn't worry about looking up points. Programmers Google, check references, etc. Of course knowing more is valuable, but generally speaking, we do rely on references for the details.

The other point is that you develop that memory through experience. You cannot read and suddenly be programming a game (text only or not). As much as you might claim understanding the material through reading, you actually learn through programming. Which is what szecs said.

Quote:
I feel like such an idiot, I keep asking and asking and asking, and yet I never make any progress
Perhaps it's because you're mostly asking, and not doing on your own. The answer is to settle down, put in hard work and effort over significant time. And to accept that initially you are going to be doing absolutely trivial things.

This isn't a particularly hard answer to find, because it's been asked and answered publicly so many times. It's more likely, that you don't like the answer. There's no easy path to making games. You need to settle down and work hard. And you won't do this if you find the discipline boring.

Or ask a better question...?

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Quote:
Original post by szecs
Quote:
Original post by Jonny_S
I personally find big fat books like that sams book better for reference. Generally I'll do the first few chapters, start writing little projects, if I get stuck or don't know how to do something I'll flick to the relevant chapter and learn about it.

Forcing yourself through a book means you'll take a lot less in, you'll skim over bits just to get to the end. I've found for me, this approach works, I find the examples in books are often boring, so I come up with my own. I might learn the material covered in the book a little slower but I feel I get more out of it.


This approach works not just for you. This IS the way to learn programming.

Do you want to learn sex from books? No. You want (and can only) learn sex in the real life.


LOL!

As for the OP, I personally don't like the Sams's teach yourself books very much, and prefer other books, but like szecs said, you don't learn coding by just reading. You need to do coding as well. If you don't like the Sam's books, maybe it's the style (as it was with me) that doesn't go with you. There are other books out there as well.....

Good luck!

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