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Pitfalls to VS2010?

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I just ordered my copy of VS2010 Pro the other day and I will be getting it next week, my question is should I expect any pitfalls going from VS2008 Pro -> VS2010 Pro? I guess not so much pitfalls, but major changes that might affect previous libraries for gaming/other, SDL, SFML, PhysFS, boost, Box2D, etc... I had no real reason to upgrade, except I like to stay up on times with technology and the latest software even though I love how VS2008 worked for me. I heard they are supposed to have intellisense for C++ now is that true so I don't have to have VisualX installed? I think that is all my questions any kind of information is appreciated, it is MS so I really don't expect it to be too different.

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C++ has had Intellesense for a long time, however the design of C# makes it much easier to dynamically compile for feature such as auto-complete. Supposedly Intellesense for C++ was rewritten for VS2010 and should work a lot better, however it'll likely never be as featureful as the C# Intellesense due to the complex nature of C++.

The largest pitfall you are likely to encounter with VS2010 is that a lot of addins may not be updated to work with it yet, and since many larger development companies will be sticking with earlier versions a lot of addins will be focusing on supporting them and VS2010 support may be slow coming.

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Well, if you ordered a paid version of Visual Studio 2010, I certainly hope that it gives you a better impression then I got!

I ended up downgrading back to Visual Studio 2008 because of the changes to the help system. See, they completely took out the Dynamic Help panel, and instead of the old MSDN system, it is now a bunch of HTML files that calls your web browser, which means no index where you start typing the first letters until it finds the entries.

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So far everything is about what I expected, I don't use there help system so no worries there. I use Google for everything I need to know anyways. I am working on Ordering Visual Assist X for a student license since I am still in college and my old version doesn't support any more updates, just have to wait on the approval from Whole Tomato. Anyways thanks for the info guys, hopefully I don't notice things I cannot get over since I have been using VS2008 for a few years now, but going from VS2005 to VS2008 I didn't really notice anything different that made me want to go backwards that I can remember, so I am hoping that I don't get this and feel the need to go backwards, but at least ill have the newest VAX. Oh yea yes this is a paid version so... I better be satisfied with it, but I think the paid versions have more features, maybe in the free version you found it lacking something that is in the paid, that I don't know...yet!

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They removed the EMACS mode. Sob. Schniffle.

I've had to remap all the keys I use that are emacsy and I type without thinking and cause conniptions. And still I don't have a kill-ring.

Oh, how I loathe Windows editor setups. Oh yeah, and the keyboard customise thing is a modal dialog. So I can't pop it up fiddle with a setting, try it and then fiddle some more because I have to keep closing and reopening it.


Shocking poor design there. Well. No. Not shocking really.

More sort of "expected given their history".

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Quote:
Original post by Bearhugger
Well, if you ordered a paid version of Visual Studio 2010, I certainly hope that it gives you a better impression then I got!

I ended up downgrading back to Visual Studio 2008 because of the changes to the help system. See, they completely took out the Dynamic Help panel, and instead of the old MSDN system, it is now a bunch of HTML files that calls your web browser, which means no index where you start typing the first letters until it finds the entries.

Yup if you don't have the fastest internet connection the new help system can be a real pain!
It's probably one of the biggest gripes I also have compared to VS2008 and it seems that I'm not alone:
Visual Studio 2010 offline help experience is inferior to the Visual Studio 2008 offline help experience
Other than that most of the major changes you need to look out for, like the MSBuild system, is all mentioned in the readme file.
Lastly, as with any new VS release you'll have to wait a while after release for official support for things like the Intel compiler, Peforce plugin, etc.


[Edited by - daviangel on July 16, 2010 3:27:00 PM]

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Couple of things I've noticed.

The help system, as others have mentioned, is shocking. It's quicker to type a query in google and click the result than have it find the answer on your own hard drive. Do yourself a favour and save over a gig by not installing that.

I've also had a problem closing VS2010 if I have the DirectX debug runtimes enabled. That could be just me.

Also, even with the new intellisense, if you have been using VAX before get it again. Can't live without it!

One last thing, it creates a lot more debug files. I compiled a small single file app in debug and got over 100meg of debug files!

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I just upgraded to 2010 this week myself and, though I hate to say it about a new purchase of yours, I find it to be an almost strict DOWNgrade compared to 2008. I was totally unimpressed with the new intellisense, to the point where I just had to turn it off because it was putting red squiggles everywhere that it really should have been able to figure out. I have no idea what was supposed to be improved, because it certainly works no better (arguably actually worse) than it did in 2008, at least for my projects. Echoing others' suggestions that VAX is still almost a required purchase.

On the other hand, VAX gives you more than just improved intellisense. For me it would be worth the price of admission just for the more detailed syntax coloring and the acronym-completion (e.g. type "ods" to have it suggest "OutputDebugStream").

Since you're concerned with other libraries, 2010 breaks several boost libraries. You'll have to get the patched ones from its SVN repo if you want to use them. The prime example for me was the property_tree library, which I use a lot, is broken by 2010. SDL 1.3 development release works fine so far, and I can't speak to any of the other libraries you list.

As for the good points, it's let me start preliminary work on porting some cross-platform software to C++ 0x, now that both VC and GCC have experimental support for some features. Getting those rvalue references in everywhere I can :)

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I just got my upgrade from VS2005, but I've been toying with it at work, so far the mayor pitfall I found is that VC++ directories are now set per project rather than global, which is good, but makes CMake choke when trying to find paths, I think there is a "default profile" for that, but I haven't looked hard enough for that.

It FINALLY includes the stdint.h and cstdint standard headers, so that's a very good thing.

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Quote:
Original post by Kwizatz
I just got my upgrade from VS2005, but I've been toying with it at work, so far the mayor pitfall I found is that VC++ directories are now set per project rather than global, which is good, but makes CMake choke when trying to find paths, I think there is a "default profile" for that, but I haven't looked hard enough for that.


Open a C++ project and go to View->Property Manager. Property Manager opens in the same tab group as the solution explorer, which is something the documentation helpfully does not explain, so the first half dozen times I tried this I thought the damn window didn't actually open. Then under the Microsoft.Cpp.Win32.User property pages you can add per user directories.

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Thanks! I knew it wasn't just me [smile].

Wait... I don't see "Microsoft.Cpp.Win32.User" anywhere, do I have to create an empty project?

Edit: Yes, must be a VS generated project, one from CMake wont contain it.

[Edited by - Kwizatz on July 16, 2010 11:38:41 AM]

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I don't use the VS help system so I didn't notice anything with that-- I've found VS2010 to be a huge upgrade from 2008.

-All the windows can be dragged outside the main window, nice for multiple monitors

-New 0x language features like lambda's, R value ref's, auto etc ..also additions to standard library such as unique_ptr. Makes C++ feel far less clunky.


Of course you need VAX, but you have always needed VAX anyway

The managed side also has new stuff like dynamic keyword in C#

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Quote:
Original post by Shinkage
I just upgraded to 2010 this week myself and, though I hate to say it about a new purchase of yours, I find it to be an almost strict DOWNgrade compared to 2008. I was totally unimpressed with the new intellisense, to the point where I just had to turn it off because it was putting red squiggles everywhere that it really should have been able to figure out. I have no idea what was supposed to be improved, because it certainly works no better (arguably actually worse) than it did in 2008, at least for my projects. Echoing others' suggestions that VAX is still almost a required purchase.
That's really surprising because I've had the complete opposite experience with VS 2010 Intellisense and C++. With 2008 I had to compile often to see if my code was syntactically, but with 2010 I generally rely on the red squigglies to find errors as I type. I've seen it handle everything from macros to templates to lambdas, and have had numerous occasions where I swore Intellisense was wrong only to discover that I was wrong when I tried to compile. And this is in a huge code base with tons of headers and code of all variety.

You should try figuring out what's wrong with your Intellisense setup, because it's nearly flawless in its accuracy as far as I can tell. The biggest downside is performance when compared with .NET Intellisense since it takes a few seconds for it to update and display the autocomplete list.

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I found upgrading to 2010 to be a pleasant experience. Granted I never used VAX, be compared to 2008 intellisense, 2010 is solid for C++ code. I compile projects FAR less now and rely almost entirely on the 'red squigglys' for compile time error checking.

The C++0x functionality (as limited as it is) is VERY nice to have (I just wish they'd add variadic templates ASAP).

Overall, I'm quite impressed.

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Quote:
Original post by SiCrane
Quote:
Original post by Kwizatz
I just got my upgrade from VS2005, but I've been toying with it at work, so far the mayor pitfall I found is that VC++ directories are now set per project rather than global, which is good, but makes CMake choke when trying to find paths, I think there is a "default profile" for that, but I haven't looked hard enough for that.


Open a C++ project and go to View->Property Manager. Property Manager opens in the same tab group as the solution explorer, which is something the documentation helpfully does not explain, so the first half dozen times I tried this I thought the damn window didn't actually open. Then under the Microsoft.Cpp.Win32.User property pages you can add per user directories.

You also have to make sure that Tools -> Settings -> Expert Settings is enabled for the Property Manager option to even be there, at least with VS2010 Express. I just installed it and the setting was to defaulted to Basic Settings. Thanks for the training wheels, Microsoft [rolleyes]

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Quote:
Original post by mutex
That's really surprising because I've had the complete opposite experience with VS 2010 Intellisense and C++. With 2008 I had to compile often to see if my code was syntactically, but with 2010 I generally rely on the red squigglies to find errors as I type. I've seen it handle everything from macros to templates to lambdas, and have had numerous occasions where I swore Intellisense was wrong only to discover that I was wrong when I tried to compile. And this is in a huge code base with tons of headers and code of all variety.


After some experimentation, it seems to be on account of the project having a PCH that's not named StdAfx.h. At least that's my guess. I did the ol' "change everything until it works, but you have no idea why" bit and it eventually found the scads of symbols it was missing. Guess whatever it is that made it find its own PCH was something I hadn't managed to try first time I was messing with it!

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As a follow-up, this was my problem:
https://connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/details/552449/

Basically, if you want to have a non-flat directory structure in your project, you need to manually add the directory with your PCH file to your project's include path. Rather silly bug if you ask me--it's not as if intellisense doesn't know about your PCH settings.

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that thing is sloooow!

just got first contact over the weekend. i'm on an i5 + intel ssd, so i'm used to snappiness (and care about it).

what ever clicks, keycommands i do (even navigating from one button to another with the tab button in some dialog) has a half-second delay.

really bad.

i'll test out if there are other uses for me, but so far, i'm dissapointed.

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