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[UI] Registration Form

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<p>Hello,


I'd like to discuss with you about registration forms, here is mine:
<a data-ipb='nomediaparse' href='http://alfodr.com:12345/register/'>Registration Form</a>


What is different from other registration forms? I wanted to create a registration as simple, fast and easy as humanly possible.

So in contrary to virtually all other forms I know of, this one is working single field by field. So as soon as you make a mistake it is immediately shown not like those big registration forms with many fields where you first have to SEARCH for the mistake you did (yes, this happens more often than you'd think)..

Additionally I've got a funny password generator which generates long safe passwords which are still easy enough to remember (you'll see it if you look at the registration email.


<b>What I'd mainly like to hear from you:</b>
1) Is there still something annoying in my registration form?
2) In general, what annoying things did you experience with registration forms (examples: you make a mistake and password fields are resetted.. or captcha is gone.. or you have to scroll/search to find the mistake)
3) Are there still things that could be easier?


<b>Why is the registration form so important?</b>
I'm planning a browser game and each user who doesn't sign up due to a hard sign up process ultimately means less money!
&nbsp;</p> Edited by Josh Petrie

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I think you're taking a step backwards here... Now you're forcing your users to submit information one at a time, instead of all with the push of a button.

There are many forms out there that have solved the "incorrect info" problem by merely having the script place some type of red message next to the field. For example, if you type in a username and then click the next field, it will immediately look in the database and see if that username is taken, if it's taken, it will say "This username is already taken" in red text next to the field. This way, the user can then simply go back to the field and modify it.

Same thing for if they enter the second e-mail field (verification) wrong. It will say "validation e-mail doesn't match" or something. Without having the user reload the form and start over.

Some username fields also have a "check availability" button next to the field so a user could easily hit the button to check if the name is available.

I think your method is a bit confusing and also not really necessary considering the alternatives.

A great example of this type of form is the yahoo email signup... it shows both the "availability" button for usernames, as well as red text if you don't type both passwords correctly, etc. (even has a nifty password strength meter to make sure you get a nice password)

Also if the name you want is taken, it even goes so far as to list available suggestions that are close to that name. It even pops a little "i" info tooltip like thing next to the text fields as you select them, to better explain what info they are wanting.

So definitely take a look at something like that

https://edit.yahoo.com/registration?.src=fpctx&.intl=us&.done=http://www.yahoo.com/

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I have to agree with the above poster.

There are sufficient methods to do a live update on a registration form so that the user will know instantly if there is a problem (one great example is direct web remoting).

Additionally, your method could prove frustrating when dealing with "taken usernames". E.g. I want to use the nickname "Gester" - click next - already taken - GesterX - click next - already taken - Gesterx1 - click next already taken... now I am beginning to get frustrated becasue I cannot get past stage 3 of the registration form so I simply browse away from the web site.

With the live updates, by taking out the action if clicking "Next" every attempt that frustration is alleviated.

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Well, but look at the yahoo example, in my case you click 'next' in the yahoo case you click 'check' or you click into the next field.. See that the name is taken, and then you have to repeat it anyway.It's quite the same, in both cases you have to type in the username and then click something to check the name (in my form you have to mouseclick 'next' or press enter, in yahoo you have to mouseclick another field or press tab') Edited by Josh Petrie

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Quote:
Original post by NewSoftzzz
1) Is there still something annoying in my registration form?
2) In general, what annoying things did you experience with registration forms (examples: you make a mistake and password fields are resetted.. or captcha is gone.. or you have to scroll/search to find the mistake)
3) Are there still things that could be easier?


1. The fact that I have to enter in my email address. Often if I'm trying a game out for the first time if it asks me for my email I usually say next...

2. If a registration form times out and I lose all my information. Grrr.

Also asking for too much information and too much error checking can make a form annoying. This often occurs when programmers make a form too strict.

e.g. "Please enter in your 5 digit ZIP plus the 4 digit extension." Too bad I'm not from the United States.

Another pet peeve of mine is when the country dropdown has every single country in the entire world in it. Completely unnecessary imho.

3. Personally I think a standard form is easier to fill out and use than the one-by-one form.

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Quote:
Original post by NewSoftzzz
It's quite the same, in both cases you have to type in the username and then click something to check the name (in my form you have to mouseclick 'next' or press enter, in yahoo you have to mouseclick another field or press tab')
Yes, it is really the same, but yours seems more annoying, and judging by the fact that the first 4 people to respond to you think so I'd say it's not uncommon for people to think so.

People get used to doing things a certain way when it comes to UI elements, and unless you have a compelling reason to do things differently you should generally stick to what people are used to; it will be familiar, and will feel most comfortable even if an alternative is potentially better.

Your method breaks down the form into a simple 4-step process. Even though a "normal" form would have all the same fields and validation involved, putting it all on one page makes it feel like a 1-step process.


I would suggest putting all the fields on the same page and using client-side and/or AJAX calls to provide inline feedback to the user. Don't forget to re-check anything that has been validated client-side upon submission, as you can't trust the client machine!


Good on you for trying out new things to see if you can improve the user experience -- but please, if the data you collect from test users suggests they prefer the old way, don't hold on to your idea just because you want to prove it right. Do get more people to try it out before you blindly trust us though, as we could well be the only 4 people who would prefer the standard method over yours.

Hope that helps! [smile]

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<p>I asked 4 girls to test it and they all liked it.

One complained about not being able to choose a password. Besides that she still liked it overall.

Why is there such a big difference in opinions between them and you?


The best explanation would be that my original idea is actually working correctly. Meaning, it is as easy as it can be. And non technical people like those 4 girls do like it. You, on the other hand, as technical-minded people are used to complicated things, so subconsciously you may feel insulted by this oversimple and overeasy form which makes you dislike it?
&nbsp;</p> Edited by Josh Petrie

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Quote:
Original post by NewSoftzzz
The best explanation would be that my original idea is actually working correctly.
That's an explanation, but not neccesarily the best explanation. Did you try your test subjects with both styles of form and ask them to choose a preference, or did you just ask if they liked the form they were using?

Quote:
Meaning, it is as easy as it can be. And non technical people like those 4 girls do like it.
As I said above, unless you got your subjects to compare both systems you don't really have a meaningful baseline to conclude your system is as easy as possible; it is easy to use, but not yet neccesarily easiest.

However, if we assume it is easiest for non-technical people we have another question; are your target audience non-technical, or are they more likely to agree with the responses you've had here? I would suggest that people who will play a browser based game are more likely to be technical, but this might not be your target market. [smile]


Quote:
so subconsciously you may feel insulted by this oversimple and overeasy form which makes you dislike it?
It my personal case I don't think this is the explanation; rather I'm more comfortable with a standardised single-page system due to familiarity. I'm not insulted by the simplicity, but it is outside my comfort zone, and therefore strikes me as less simple.

Hope that's useful.

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<p><span>Quote:</span></p> <i>Original post by jbadams</i>
That's <i>an</i> explanation, but not neccesarily the <i>best</i> explanation. Did you try your test subjects with both styles of form and ask them to choose a preference, or did you just ask if they liked the form they were using?{C} <p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>{C}{C}
Hm, probably the wording wasn't correct. I meant it is the explanation I like most :P

No, I didn't let them compare those two styles, I asked them to compare it to their general experience with registration forms..</p> Edited by Josh Petrie

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With everyone wanting to do things faster, but with the same quality, I highly recommend putting all the required fields on one page. The only exception may be a form in which multiple (~20+) fields are required. But I don't know too many sites that have a need for such requirement.

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Quote:
Original post by NewSoftzzz
Meaning, it is as easy as it can be ... You, on the other hand, as technical-minded people are used to complicated things, so subconsciously you may feel insulted by this oversimple and overeasy form which makes you dislike it?

I would think "as easy as it can be" would be to show all the inputs, and use AJAX to check anything filled out whenever you change fields. When you leave the username box to go to the email box, have it turn red and/or pop up a note saying that name is already taken; if the two email addresses don't match, mark them when the user is done typing them both in. Allow moving to the next field with TAB, ENTER, or clicking on another field, and fire the AJAX check then. Finally, use AJAX for the final submittal too; then if the mistake is only found at the end the user doesn't have to fill everything out again or even click "back", they can just find the marked field and try again.

This has nothing at all to do with whether or not someone is technical-minded. It requires the least amount of thought, speeds up the process, and provides near-instant feedback on what they entered.

Just my 2 cents (but also approved by the two members of my family who really shouldn't even touch a computer as far as tech skills are concerned).

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