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"Content Management" System

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Hello all!

Today I had the first meeting with a group composed mostly of designers, writers etc. Right now I'm the only programmer and responsible for everything "tech".

The problem is, I'm very much versed with code versioning tools like SVN, GIT, etc. But the others are not and I don't think they will be able to understand it fast and easily and get themselves working together in such a system.

So my question is: do you guys know any online/offline tools where we can submit artwork, texts, etc so everyone can see the various versions, corrections and submit their comments and newer stuff?

what about project management tools? any tips for a game programming scenario?

I will keep the code base in a SVN server anyway.

thanks!

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To be honest, regardless of what system you choose they will still need to learn it. I don't understand how this is any different from GIT or SVN in that regard.

I have seen all sorts of solutions to this problem though in the end it really depends on your needs, team size, amount of content needed, your expertise, and your time to dedicate to the problem.

Solutions I have seen:

Perforce with a visual tool (P4Win or P4V) allowing artists to check-out and check-in various content. You can actually flag different folders or types of files to as exclusive checkout if there are types of content that are not easily merged.

A network file system used wild west style with producers copying over approved content to the official data build.

A SQL database paired with perforce and a custom made visual tool. Not all assets were stored in perforce, some lived solely in the database. Perforce/SQL api was integrated into all tools for convenience.

A SQL database paired with an ftp server and a custom made visual tool. Not all assets were stored in the ftp, some lived solely in the database. SQL/FTP api was integrated into all tools for convenience.


In the end, as long as there is a visual tool able to be used it isn't too bad to teach the content devs how to use a system. Most of these tools aren't really that complex either.

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Perforce works really well. I know tons of non engineers who can easily use if (through p4win at least). In the end the benefits would outweigh any amount of ramp up time (which would probably be a couple hours for each person).

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Quote:
Original post by dclyde
Perforce with a visual tool (P4Win or P4V) allowing artists to check-out and check-in various content. You can actually flag different folders or types of files to as exclusive checkout if there are types of content that are not easily merged.


This solution would be great. But -at this moment in time- we're a zero budget team, so perforce is out of reach.

You think that a crude SVN management of art+texts are feasible? I mean, the svn won't tell which changes were made to a PSD, but it will keep every version in the database. Would a "raw" SVN system handle the sheer size of checking in/out PSDs and other art files?


Quote:
Original post by dclyde
In the end, as long as there is a visual tool able to be used it isn't too bad to teach the content devs how to use a system. Most of these tools aren't really that complex either.


That's the learning curve problem I'm referring to! Dunno if the artists are even comfortable with a tortouseSVN system, but they sure can learn it. The thing is: will they keep on using it? I'm not a designer, but this 'process' sounds weird when your dealing with image files and the like. Innit?

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I suspect that for large binary files like .PSD's, git would be better. SVN does have some performance issues, and there's that whole thing where it stores two copies of the file in your working directory. I've heard it said that Git has better performance, with large files especially.

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I think the keywords you're looking for are "Document management system", "Digital asset management" and "Collaborative software"/"Groupware" (look in wikipedia).

Talking about VCS, Git works fine with binary data, unlike SVN, which assumes textual data (and is slow).

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Hi all,
i've been using SVN with Tortoise SVN on Windows, command line SVN on Linux and Mac OS for about two years for text and binary data of all kinds.

This solution is easy to set up a SSH svn server and a few accounts for all members. The use of SVN is simple as you only needs 3 or 4 commands regularly as a normal user, only the admin of the SVN server will need to know more indepth.

I suggest you use this setup for starters.
Greetings.

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i would agree that for a beginner, subversion is a good method for source control. I have found it works 'ok' with binary data however it is slower as it cannot properly diff a binary file and just stores the entire file as-is instead of deltas.

For the completely uninitiated i agree that a document management system may be better as by design, source control systems are designed for developers.

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