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ForexSurfr

C++ Rookie.

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I am learning C++ and would like to find out from the veterans out there what is the most efficient way of learning this language. Through research I have found the book "C++ How to Program" by P.J. Deitel and am working through the book. I also have on order "C Primer Plus" by Stephen Prata.

Though my "How to Program" has limited questions and exercises. Secondly you have to have an instructor's edition to verify the answers to exercises and this resource is not accessible to the general public.

Does anyone out there know of any good workbooks with questions and exercises and answers to these items?

Secondly, what is the most recommended learning path?

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Opinions differ on this one.. Some say it's best to go straight for C++, other say start with C first.
Since one can't forget his/hers knowledge, no one really can tell from experience which way is better.
I for my part learned C first, and I think its an easy way of getting into programming, since C is pretty simple compared to C++.
Of course when then going to c++ you need to realize that you can't code the same way in C++ as you did in C, but it'll be a lot easier moving from C to C++ than from nothing to C++.
And if you do it quick enough, there shouldn't be any bad habits you could memorize.

The best book for C coding imho is The C Programming Language.
Good examples and solutions, and you can really work through it quickly.
You'll find it for a few bucks on ebay, just make sure it's the second edition (ansi c)

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The answer to this depends very heavily on whether you know other programming languages already or not, and possibly also which ones, if any.

There's a huge difference between learning yet another programming language, and learning to program.

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It's not uncommon for colleges/universites to offer 1-2 credit C++ primer courses. That might be worth looking into for you as well, if you are either 1. in college/uni or 2. don't mind shelling out a good chunk of cash for credits.

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