• Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  

Language reference question

This topic is 2651 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

going through some old cds i burned ages ago i made a discovery
i found that in the way way back when i started programming the first time and learning i assumed it was c++ that i had bitten off a bit of and learned
looking at this old source code i now realize it was borland turbo c.

now the amount i know in borland turbo c is very very little from about 14 years ago and it was on a dos only 386 that i was "programing" on so....

so my question since i havent dug into c++ much yet is

1. finish learning c and add c++ later
or
2. skip c and dive into c++

I eventually (read sooner or later, sooner is better) want to make programming a career and not a hobby. now this can be self publishing little tiny games/apps that i sell off a homepage or it can end up a "real" job working for one of the major companies. i,m more partial to the self published route as then i can live where ever i want as long as it has internet connectivity to upload updates/new programs.

anyways thanks for the answers in advance

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
Learning a single language well is very important if you want to make (and finish) a couple of games on your own.

I'd pick a more productive language to get up to speed but C++ is a valid choice as well.

The only reason I'd recommend learning C before C++ is because C might help you to get to know programming in general including pointers, side effects and such. However, you can learn these too when diving into C++ and skipping C. Please pick your books, web sites and friends carefully as many will teach you C++ with a strong C flavour and that is something you might want to avoid.

Did you consider learning Flash or Silverlight? That might be a very fast way you create a couple of show cases. An other solution might be to pick XNA. The thing is that these platforms solve a couple of nasty things that take the fun out of programming (deployment, OS and hardware dependencies etc.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Computercodemonkey
1. finish learning c and add c++ later
or
2. skip c and dive into c++
How about one of these options instead?
3. skip c and c++ and use c#, pick up c or c++ or python later
4. skip c and c++ and use python, puck up c or c++ or c# later

Just saying, you have more than 2 options here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
yes and fast efficient programs are made in c/c++ not to mention that hardware dependencies is erm... not a valid argument against c.... its like saying you cant install linux because of hardware dependencies.


C is fast powerful and efficent
C++ is its big brother

and while i may have more options i chosse to use just these 2 options

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Do not be distracted by statements such as "C/C++ is faster/better/saving the world"

Your main concern is probably productivity and learning efficiently (I could be wrong)

C and C++ are by no means faster by definition; I have seen very slow C\C++ programs. There might come a time when you need to be worried about that single clock cycle and then C\C++ might be your (nearly) only option. But you are not there yet, I think.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Computercodemonkey
not to mention that hardware dependencies is erm... not a valid argument against c.... its like saying you cant install linux because of hardware dependencies.


That is not what I meant. It is quite some work to make a C\C++ program OS/hardware independent. I did not say it is impossible. And this work is no fun IMHO and distracts from learning a language.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement